The Heyman Center is Columbia University's central site for the Humanities.

The Heyman Center for the Humanities provides the intellectual and physical space for interdisciplinary discussions among members of the Columbia community and the New York City public. It brings together faculty and students from across the university—from the humanities, social and natural sciences, law, medicine, journalism, and the arts—to share thinking, debate ideas, and collectively consider methodological, conceptual, and ethical issues of common interest and concern.  It sponsors public programming—lectures, poetry and fiction reading, workshops, conferences, symposia, seminars, and performances—fosters scholarly and artistic collaborations, and offers meeting spaces for its various affiliated members.

A list of our conferences, lectures, discussions, poetry readings and other performances can be found under "Events" on this website.  The Center also sponsors a work-in-progress series, in which faculty and invited guests gather, over lunch, to discuss new work presented by their colleagues.

Since it was built in the late 1970s, the Center has been home to the Society of Fellows in the Humanities at Columbia, a group of postdoctoral fellows supported by generous funding from the Mellon and Kenan foundations.  In the coming years, the Heyman Center, in collaboration with the Society of Fellows, plans to offer additional fellowships to junior and senior faculty both at Columbia and from other universities.

The Heyman Center also houses Columbia's Institute for Comparative Literature and Society, the Society of Senior Scholars--a group of emeritus faculty who teach primarily in the Core Curriculum--and The Friends of the Heyman Center.  All of these groups host seminars and colloquia of their own throughout the year. The Lionel Trilling Seminars and the Edward Said Memorial Lecture are also based at the Heyman Center. Notices for these can be found in the Events section of our website.

The Heyman Center is a member of the Consortium of Humanities Centers and Institutes.

  • Friends of the Heyman Center

    The Friends of the Heyman Center, under the direction of James V. Mirollo, Parr Professor Emeritus of English and Comparative Literature, sponsors colloquia on topics of wide-ranging appeal, registration for which is open to the public.

  • Affiliated Organizations

    The Heyman Center collaborates closely with a number of institutions, within the university and beyond.

  • Heyman Center for the Humanities Public Humanities Fellowship in Partnership with the New York Council for the Humanities

    The Public Humanities Fellowship was developed in partnership by the Heyman Center for the Humanities and the New York Council for the Humanities to bring humanities scholarship into the public realm, to encourage emerging humanities scholars to conceive of their work in relation to the public sphere, to develop skills for doing so, and to strengthen the community of the public humanities in New York State. The yearlong Fellowship provides training in the methods and approaches of public scholarship and supports the work of Fellows in exploring the public dimensions of their own scholarship in partnership with a community organization that serves public audiences. The 2013-2014 Public Humanities Fellow is Max Hayward. For more information on the Public Humanities Fellowship, including applicant information, please contact New York Council for the Humanities Program Officer, Leah Nahmias at [email protected] 

  • Heyman Center for the Humanities News, 3 April 2014

    CALL FOR PROPOSALS: COURSE DEVELOPMENT IN SCIENCE AND SOCIETY ELIGIBILITY: ALL CORE LECTURERS AND TENURED OR TENURE-­‐TRACK FACULTY AT COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY (INCLUDING BARNARD) AMOUNT OF AWARD: $3,000 In connection with the opening of the Columbia University Center for Science and Society in the fall of 2014, funding is available for the development of new undergraduate curricular offerings in the study of science and society. The aim is to introduce courses that can be offered within current disciplinary structures, as part of already-­‐existing majors and concentrations, but that bring significant discussion of science and society into these offerings. Examples might include an introductory-­‐level history lecture course that integrates the history of science and technology with political and social history, a seminar on the philosophy or history of the neurosciences, or a literature seminar focusing on scientific texts. Other areas of interest include interdisciplinary environmental studies and environmental humanities, and the sociology, anthropology, politics, and economics of global science, technology, medicine, and public health, including in relation to race, gender, and sexuality. In order to apply, please complete the linked PDF form below and submit it, along with a full CV, to Deborah Coen, director of curriculum development for the Center for Science and Society, [email protected], by June 15. Proposals will be judged by a multi-­‐disciplinary panel drawn from the steering committee of the Center for Science and Society, and awards will be announced by July 15. For more information about the Call for Proposals, see PDF link.

  • Heyman Center for the Humanities News, 7 April 2014

    The Institute for Research on Women, Gender and Sexuality (IRWGS) invites proposals for the development of new curricular offerings in women’s, gender, and sexuality studies. The Institute aims to develop courses that can be offered within current disciplinary structures, as part of already-existing majors and concentrations, but that bring significant interdisciplinary content into these offerings. There is consistent and growing student interest in gender studies in relation to a diversity of fields. Undergraduates often come to IRWGS seeking courses in gender and public health, disability studies, sexuality studies, media studies, intersectionality, and courses in human rights. IRWGS therefore seeks to develop courses in these areas (but not limited to them). The IRWGS Curriculum Development Grant competition is open to tenured or tenure-track professors, Core Lecturers, and current PhD students (ABD) at Columbia. Successful applicants will receive a $3,000 research allowance. These funds may be used to support research or to hire a graduate student or advanced undergraduate to provide research and teaching assistance. (N.B. in the case of tenured faculty, successful applicants MUST use the funds or to hire a graduate or advanced undergraduate student to provide research and/or teaching assistance; $500 may be used by tenured faculty for the purchase of books and other research materials). In order to facilitate the teaching of these courses at Columbia, successful applicants will commit to teaching the course within two years of the completion of the syllabus. For Tenured and Tenure-track faculty and Core Lecturers: Please submit your proposed course (using the form link below) and a full CV to Laura Ciolkowski, IRWGS Associate Director ([email protected]), by or before June 1, 2014. A committee comprising members of the Institute’s Executive Committee will evaluate these submissions. Awards will be announced by July 15, 2014. For more information about the Call for Proposals, see PDF link.