Upcoming Events

This lecture series will explore the enigma of how what we write relates back to the experience of bodies, healthy and unwell. Our speakers will explore how the medical humanities build on and revise earlier notions of the “medical arts.” At stake are the problem of representation and the interpretation of cultural products, past and present, through medical models

In The Mediterranean Incarnate, anthropologist Naor Ben-Yehoyada takes us aboard the Naumachos for a thirty-seven-day voyage in the fishing grounds between Sicily and Tunisia. He also takes us on a historical exploration of the past eighty years to show how the Mediterranean has reemerged as a modern transnational region. From Sicilian poaching in North African territory to the construction of the TransMediterranean gas pipeline, Ben-Yehoyada examines the transformation of political action, imaginaries, and relations in the central Mediterranean while detailing the remarkable bonds that have formed between the Sicilians and Tunisians who live on its waters.

13/13 Seminar Series
Uprising 13/13: Revolution

Thursday, September 14, 2017

1/13 | THE MODERN CONCEPT OF REVOLUTION  

Join us for a more nuanced analysis of the relationship between prisons and public education with authors Dr. Damien Sojoyner and Dr. Sabina Vaught and respondents Robin McGinty and Dr. Carla Shedd. 

Donna Masini’s third book of poems, 4:30 Movie, is forthcoming in 2018. She is also the author of Turning to Fiction and That Kind of Danger (which won the 1994 Barnard Women Poets Prize), as well as About Yvonne, a novel. “Donna Masini’s poems are …urban, sexual, working-class, passionate, marked by great moral intelligence and generosity.  She is one of the marvelous new poets this country is generating in a terrible time” (Adrienne Rich). She is Professor of English at Hunter College, where she teaches in the MFA Creative Writing program. Sharon Olds is the author of thirteen books of poetry, including the recent Odes, and Stag’s Leap, which won the 2013 Pulitzer Prize. Her work is “remarkable for its candor, its eroticism, and its power to move” (David Leavitt). She teaches at New York University. Brittany Perham’s Double Portrait won the 2016 Barnard Women Poets Prize, chosen by Claudia Rankine for poems that are “by turns playful, mournful, indulgent, musical, insightful, and all the way human.” She is a Jones Lecturer in Poetry at Stanford University, where she was a Wallace Stegner Fellow.

Terrance Hayes is the author of several books of poetry, including How to Be Drawn; Lighthead, which won the 2010 National Book Award for poetry; Muscular Music, which won the Kate Tufts Discovery Award; and Hip Logic, winner of the 2001 National Poetry Series. A recipient of a fellowship from the MacArthur Foundation, he is a chancellor of the Academy of American Poets, poetry editor at New York Times Magazine, and Distinguished Writer in Residence at NYU.  

This lecture series will explore the enigma of how what we write relates back to the experience of bodies, healthy and unwell. Our speakers will explore how the medical humanities build on and revise earlier notions of the “medical arts.” At stake are the problem of representation and the interpretation of cultural products, past and present, through medical models.

Material & Institutional Aspects of Field & Discipline Formation

Monday, September 25, 2017 - Tuesday, September 26, 2017

How do fields, disciplines, and larger formations such as “the sciences” or “the humanities” come into being? What roles do objects, institutions, and materialized concepts play in these processes? These are some of the questions addressed by this two-day exploratory workshop.

This lecture series will explore the enigma of how what we write relates back to the experience of bodies, healthy and unwell. Our speakers will explore how the medical humanities build on and revise earlier notions of the “medical arts.” At stake are the problem of representation and the interpretation of cultural products, past and present, through medical models. 

Jamaican 1970s

Thursday, September 28, 2017

Joyce in the Digital Age

Sunday, October 1, 2017

Advances in digital media have made possible textual technologies like hypertext, semantic markup, and crowdsourced annotation—technologies that hold powerful potential applications for scholarly editing. The works of James Joyce, as highly allusive and self-referential works of literary modernism, have often been described as proto-hypertexts. As such, they form excellent subjects for the applications of these emergent technologies. This single-day conference will present work from scholars that leverage these new digital techniques toward the creation of new editions, analyses, or visualizations of Joyce’s works. The keynote lecture will feature Hans Walter Gabler, Professor Emeritus of Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität, and editor of the most influential editions of Joyce’s novels Ulysses and A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, who will present his recent work in visualizing the composition histories of the novels. A series of other talks will follow, by scholars working in computational approaches to Ulysses. In the afternoon, we will hold a workshop and hackathon, introducing participants to the new open critical editions of Portrait and Ulysses, and providing a brief introduction to textual editing with the markup language TEI XML (Text Encoding Initiative Extensible Markup Language). Participants will then be invited to contribute to the editions, by directly editing the text.

This lecture series will explore the enigma of how what we write relates back to the experience of bodies, healthy and unwell. Our speakers will explore how the medical humanities build on and revise earlier notions of the “medical arts.” At stake are the problem of representation and the interpretation of cultural products, past and present, through medical models.

13/13 Seminar Series
Uprising 13/13

Thursday, October 5, 2017

The purpose of this seminar series is to explore various modalities of uprising, disobedience, inservitude, revolt, or other forms of political contestation. Instead of including them all under the name of “revolution”—a term that has become conceptually and historically fraught—the seminar will consider how specific experiences and discourses articulate new forms of upheaval or reformulate well-known ones. By focusing on this conceptual, historical and political problematic, we intend to shine a light on experiences and manifestations that take place at the local and at the global level, as well as at the subjective and the collective level. The idea is to articulate how critical political practice is expressed and understood today.

Feminist to the Core: Puccini’s La Bohème features Naomi André (Associate Professor of Women’s Studies and Afroamerican and African Studies, University of Michigan), Mary Birnbaum (Juilliard School), Professor Suzanne Cusick (Professor of Music, NYU), and Annie Randall (Professor of Music, Bucknell University) in conversation about this year’s Music Humanities opera, Puccini’s La Bohème. "Feminist to the Core" is a lecture series that seeks to transform the conversation in and around the Columbia core curriculum.   

Black Sea Myths and Modern Europe

Friday, October 6, 2017

The symposium addresses key ancient Black Sea myths that retain a stable presence in the Western cultural imagination—Prometheus, Medea and the Argonauts, Iphigenia, Odysseus—and aims to explore their life in the lands where these myths initially emerged. It targets especially the little-studied political mobilization of these myths in the construction of modern national, regional, and pan-European identities for various communities around the Black Sea. This symposium is the first public event of a long-term international research program, mobilizing an interdisciplinary team of scholars from the U.S., U.K., Greece, Bulgaria, and the Republic of Georgia under the umbrella of the global initiative “Black Sea Networks” (http://blackseanetworks.org/), housed by the Slavic Department of Columbia University.

A symposium at the Heyman Center at Columbia University, to mark three decades since the publication of Barbara Harlow's Resistance Literature --and to mark the passing of Barbara as a teacher, mentor, interlocutor, and comrade.

Seven films about forms of resistance.

Pious Technologies and Secular Designs

Friday, October 13, 2017 - Saturday, October 14, 2017

For over a decade, scholars in sociology, anthropology, and religious studies have been engaged in a heated debate about the role of religion in modern politics and society, a discussion formerly absent from most canonical accounts of modernization and globalization. For too long, a simplistic view of the Enlightenment reigned: one in which religious regimes were quickly and completely displaced by new rational structures. The work of Charles Taylor, José Casanova and Talal Asad, among others, has been crucial in undermining such notions, revealing the religious as anything but absent from the public sphere, the secular as a notion all too intertwined with Christianity, and Western narratives about reason and progress as tenaciously—and at times violently—enchanted. To better understand the secular, therefore, one must also understand the ways in which the religious has been historically transformed and dislocated.

Seven films about forms of resistance.

This lecture series will explore the enigma of how what we write relates back to the experience of bodies, healthy and unwell. Our speakers will explore how the medical humanities build on and revise earlier notions of the “medical arts.” At stake are the problem of representation and the interpretation of cultural products, past and present, through medical models.

Seven films about forms of resistance.

Seven films about forms of resistance.

America as Theater of Spanish Modernity: An Interdisciplinary Colloquium

Monday, October 23, 2017 - Wednesday, October 25, 2017

America as Theater of Spanish Modernity: An Interdisciplinary Colloquium featuring Carlos Ramos, Juan José LaHuerta, María González Pendas, Ana Fernández Cebrián, and José M. del Pino.

Seven films about forms of resistance

Seven films about forms of resistance

Seven films about forms of resistance

3/13 | UPRISING

Memory Laws: Criminalizing Historical Narrative

Friday, October 27, 2017 - Saturday, October 28, 2017

Since the 1980s, interest in politically and legally shaping public memory regarding the Holocaust and other crimes perpetrated during the Second World War has been evident in a wide variety of arenas. One manifestation of the trend has been the increasing demand for the right to truth, which is purportedly a precondition to conflict resolution and policies of redress.  At the same time, however, there is an increased recognition of the propensity for conflicting narratives about the past, particularly instrumentalized narratives about group identity and violent pasts, to escalate hostilities among nations, ethnicities and/or religions. These hostilities, anchored as they are in the collective memory and history of conflict, have become subject to extensive legislation, with the criminalization of statements about history and violent pasts becoming more commonplace. 

This lecture series will explore the enigma of how what we write relates back to the experience of bodies, healthy and unwell. Our speakers will explore how the medical humanities build on and revise earlier notions of the “medical arts.” At stake are the problem of representation and the interpretation of cultural products, past and present, through medical models.

This book challenges the ways we read, write, store, and retrieve information in the digital age. Computers—from electronic books to smart phones—play an active role in our social lives. Our technological choices thus entail theoretical and political commitments. Dennis Tenen takes up today's strange enmeshing of humans, texts, and machines to argue that our most ingrained intuitions about texts are profoundly alienated from the physical contexts of their intellectual production. Drawing on a range of primary sources from both literary theory and software engineering, he makes a case for a more transparent practice of human–computer interaction. Plain Text is thus a rallying call, a frame of mind as much as a file format. It reminds us, ultimately, that our devices also encode specific modes of governance and control that must remain available to interpretation.

Trump and Truth

Monday, November 6, 2017 - Friday, November 10, 2017

November 6-7 and 9-10; first portion of the event is in Dublin, the second portion is at Columbia.

Poets at the Heyman Center
Poets at Barnard

Thursday, November 9, 2017

Airea D. Matthews’s first collection of poems, Simulacra, received the 2016 Yale Series of Younger Poets Award, chosen by Carl Phillips, who writes the book “offers us the poem as prose story, as an exchange of text messages with the dead, as collapsed opera, as Tweet, even as a possible mash-up of rap, litany, and Stein’s prosody,” which are all ways to enact “the ceaseless hunger that is the book’s thematic core.” She is a recipient of a 2016 Rona Jaffe Foundation Writers’ Award and an Assistant Professor of Creative Writing at Bryn Mawr College. D. A. Powell is the author of five collections, including Useless Landscape, or A Guide for Boys which received the National Book Critics Circle Award in poetry. “No accessible poet of his generation is half as original, and no poet as original is this accessible” (Stephen Burt). He is a Professor at University of San Francisco. Rachel Zucker is the author of nine books, most recently MOTHERs, a memoir, and The Pedestrians, a double collection of poetry and prose. “Her poems read like skin-of-your-teeth escapes from impending disaster”; and as mediations on time, they focus “on one of its most heartbreaking dilemmas: how to be in the moment when all you can think about is the nostalgia you’ll feel for it once it’s over. Poetry as a temporal acrobatics, outwitting distraction” (Dan Chiasson). She teaches poetry at NYU and is the host of the podcast Commonplace: Conversations with Poets (and Other People).

4/13 | #BLACKLIVESMATTER

A major American poet of the twentieth century, Gwendolyn Brooks is a writer of great formal mastery and intimate observation, most beautifully of the Chicago communities she writes of, the people who make “a sugar of/The malocclusions, the inconditions of love.” 

Roundtable on Maya Jasanoff's "The Dawn Watch: Joseph Conrad in a Global World"

This lecture series will explore the enigma of how what we write relates back to the experience of bodies, healthy and unwell. Our speakers will explore how the medical humanities build on and revise earlier notions of the “medical arts.” At stake are the problem of representation and the interpretation of cultural products, past and present, through medical models

6/13 | REVOLT: FOUCAULT IN IRAN

7/13 | DISOBEDIENCE

9/13 | THE BODY AND TROUBLE

10/13 | ANTI-IMPERIALISM/INDEPENDENCE

Events

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