Upcoming Events

CSER welcomes photographer & comedian Ryan RedCorn, member of the Osage tribe, owner of Buffalo Nickel Creative, and a member of the 1491s. Ryan and Tiffany Hale, Ph.D. Assistant Professor, Department of Religion at Barnard ask each other questions on the theme of photography, narrative, and representations of Native American people.

What is death? And what comes after? The end of life. The end of this life. Heaven. Nothingness. Ghosts, real and imagined. Such questions, and answers, have often been understood as quintessentially religious and quintessentially philosophical. They are also social, cultural, and political. Academic and affective.

In Critique 13/13, we turn to 13 critical texts—ranging from Althusser, Beauvoir, Foucault, and Freire to Adorno, Arendt, Sartre, Lorde, and Said.

New Books in the Arts & Sciences: Celebrating Recent Work by Nara B. Milanich

Description and schedule to come.

Water, Sound, and Indigenous Film: Ushui

Thursday, October 10, 2019 - Friday, October 11, 2019

Ushui is about Sagas—women shamans—and their wisdom and relation to water; how to give birth and raise children, to sing to the spirits, and what to do when they turn against us like Shekuita, the bad thunder that destroyed the town of Kemakúmake. Produced by the Bunkuaneyuman Communications Collective of indigenous Wiwa people of the Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta in Colombia.

Book Parts: A Conference

Friday, October 11, 2019

Contributors to the forthcoming volume Book Parts (Oxford University Press) will each speak about the history and meaning of different “parts” of the modern book (such as endsheets, tables of contents, and footnotes) and the keynote speaker, Leah Price (English Department, Rutgers), will respond to the day's papers and the volume as a whole.

A timely and incisive assessment of what the success of populism means for democracy. Populist movements have recently appeared in nearly every democracy around the world. Yet our grasp of this disruptive political phenomenon remains woefully inadequate. Politicians of all stripes appeal to the interests of the people, and every opposition party campaigns against the current establishment. What, then, distinguishes populism from run-of-the-mill democratic politics? And why should we be concerned by its rise?

New Books in the Arts & Sciences: Celebrating Recent Work by Stathis Gourgouris

In Critique 13/13, we turn to 13 critical texts—ranging from Althusser, Beauvoir, Foucault, and Freire to Adorno, Arendt, Sartre, Lorde, and Said.

The Theater of Change Forum

Friday, October 18, 2019 - Sunday, October 20, 2019

At a time when the United States faces growing inequality, mass incarceration, and broken immigration systems, public policies and politics are working against the active public engagement, collaboration, and trust required to build a just society. The Theater of Change is a groundbreaking methodology developed as a collaboration between the Broadway Advocacy Coalition and the Center for Institutional and Social Change at Columbia Law School. The process brings together high-level artists, law and policy students and experts, and directly impacted advocates to deepen connections and bridge gaps of disconnect and lack of understanding. Participants ultimately collaborate as equal partners and create arts-based performance pieces that have an engagement strategy to target specific areas and policies.

New Books in the Arts & Sciences: Celebrating Recent Work by Sharon Marcus

Global Think-in: The Code of Capital

Monday, October 21, 2019

Global Think-ins are vehicles for generating new ideas and perspectives on issues of global concern.

In Critique 13/13, we turn to 13 critical texts—ranging from Althusser, Beauvoir, Foucault, and Freire to Adorno, Arendt, Sartre, Lorde, and Said.

The New Humanities Faculty Salons

Tuesday, October 29, 2019

The New Humanities Faculty Salons are an opportunity to meet the six new faculty members joining Columbia during the 2019-20 school year.  They will share their new research over drinks and snacks, opening conversations across the wider Humanities community. 

Dialogues in Translation

Wednesday, October 30, 2019

Karen Van Dyck, Xiaolu Guo, Kaiama L. Glover, and Zaid Jabri, all former fellows of Columbia’s Institute for Ideas and Imagination, will discuss their diverse practices of translation and transliteration, and the artistic and political consequences of living, working, and moving between languages. The conversation began in spring 2019 at the Institute in Paris around Karen Van Dyck’s research on translingual writing of the Greek Diaspora which addresses the multilingual lives of migrants as a resource for literature, translation and social policy. Various types of movement among places - diasporic, immigrant, exilic, cosmopolitan - imagine different forms of translation that emphasize diverse ways of moving among languages: diglossia, intralingualism, transliteration, homophony. Might such translingual collaborations offer alternative translation practices and solutions to the impasses of ethnocentrism? 

Theater of War

Wednesday, November 6, 2019 - Thursday, November 7, 2019

Theater of War Productions works with leading film, theater, and television actors to present dramatic readings of seminal plays—from classical Greek tragedies to modern and contemporary works—followed by town hall-style discussions designed to confront social issues by drawing out raw and personal reactions to themes highlighted in the plays. The guided discussions underscore how the plays resonate with contemporary audiences and invite audience members to share their perspectives and experiences, and, helping to break down stigmas, foster empathy, compassion, and a deeper understanding of complex issues.

In Critique 13/13, we turn to 13 critical texts—ranging from Althusser, Beauvoir, Foucault, and Freire to Adorno, Arendt, Sartre, Lorde, and Said.

This graduate student workshop at Columbia University celebrates the publication of Alain Badiou’s major new work, The Immanence of Truths [L’Immanence des vérités (Paris: Fayard, 2018)], offering a unique, early glimpse of the work to an English-speaking audience. The workshop will include short introductory talks discussing different aspects of the book, which will be given by Jelica Sumic Riha, Norman Madarasz, Kenneth Reinhard, and Jana Ndiaye Berankova. Introductory remarks will be followed by a discussion with students based on primary texts and excerpts from the unpublished translation of The Immanence of Truths.

New Books in the Arts & Sciences: Celebrating Recent Work by Brendan O'Flaherty and Rajiv Sethi

Competing Truths: Art and the Objects of History after the Council of Trent

Friday, November 15, 2019 - Saturday, November 16, 2019

Competing Truths: Art and the Objects of History After the Council of Trent is a two-day symposium to be jointly held at the Italian Academy and the Frick Collection on November 15th & 16th, 2019. The event will bring together scholars and museum professionals in order to investigate how Italian art helped to formulate competing truths in the long aftermath of the Council of Trent, and how the strategies of that era continue to affect our understanding of historical truth today. Italian art of this period is often dismissed as propagandistic and derivative. This symposium instead fosters recent scholarship that shows the potency of art in shaping people’s beliefs during a time of deep political and spiritual divisions. Understanding how images and objects give shape to history and knowledge has never been more urgent. Thus, the aim of the symposium is not merely to advance scholarship, but to meet an acute contemporary need for perspective on how to navigate an era of competing truths.

New Books in the Arts & Sciences: Celebrating Recent Work by Gil Eyal

New Books in the Arts & Sciences: Celebrating Recent Work by Sarah Cole

In Critique 13/13, we turn to 13 critical texts—ranging from Althusser, Beauvoir, Foucault, and Freire to Adorno, Arendt, Sartre, Lorde, and Said.

In Critique 13/13, we turn to 13 critical texts—ranging from Althusser, Beauvoir, Foucault, and Freire to Adorno, Arendt, Sartre, Lorde, and Said.

The “colonial turn” considerably transformed the field of French history and led to the publication in the last 30 years of a large number of scholarly contributions concerned with the cultural, political, legal, and social aspects of French colonialism. Meanwhile, the political economy of the French colonial empire has received far less attention. The 2008 financial crisis triggered renewed interest in the history of capitalism and economic history more generally, and we are now witnessing the effects of these changes in the field of French colonial history. This conference thus seeks to bring together a new generation of historians and economists who have recently published, or are about to publish, important contributions to the economic history of the French formal and informal empires. The conference does not seek to celebrate the “return” of concerns that were central in the 1970s but rather to better delineate the contours of a new momentum.

How did Beethoven influence the other arts? And how did literature shape the composer’s reputation? In an exploration of Beethoven’s literary afterlife through the lens of chamber performance, this event will examine the formation of a musical legacy. The event will feature faculty lectures by professors Nicholas Dames (Columbia), Arden Hegele (Columbia), and Nicholas Chong (Rutgers), as well as a performance of Beethoven’s violin sonata no. 7 (Op. 30, no. 2) by Chad Hoopes and Anne-Marie McDermott.

Events

By Semester