Upcoming Events

Seven films about forms of resistance

A Body of Becketts

Monday, October 23, 2017

Renowned Beckett interpreter Lisa Dwan introduces us to her work with Samuel Beckett, discussing her longstanding engagement with his oeuvre. Drawing on her performances and personal insights from working with Billie Whitelaw to Walter Asmus, Dwan traces a narrativethrough Beckett's intense poetic trajectory and the  'Beckettian’ aesthetic, examining what it costs those who seek to bring it to life.

America as Theater of Spanish Modernity: An Interdisciplinary Colloquium featuring Carlos Ramos, Juan José LaHuerta, María González Pendas, Ana Fernández Cebrián, and José M. del Pino.

Seven films about forms of resistance

Seven films about forms of resistance

3/13 | UPRISING

Everyone seems to be writing on populism these days, which is unsurprising given the global rise of populist movements, parties, and leaders. But the relationship of populism to religion remains understudied. In response, IRCPL has organized a three-part speaker series on Populism and Religion. With this series, we aim to illuminate the broad yet distinctive nature of populism(s) by analyzing their region-specific histories, the religious posturing of populist groups on both sides of the political spectrum, and the unique rhetorics used by populist movements to appeal to the general public.

Memory Laws: Criminalizing Historical Narrative

Friday, October 27, 2017 - Saturday, October 28, 2017

Since the 1980s, interest in politically and legally shaping public memory regarding the Holocaust and other crimes perpetrated during the Second World War has been evident in a wide variety of arenas. One manifestation of the trend has been the increasing demand for the right to truth, which is purportedly a precondition to conflict resolution and policies of redress.  At the same time, however, there is an increased recognition of the propensity for conflicting narratives about the past, particularly instrumentalized narratives about group identity and violent pasts, to escalate hostilities among nations, ethnicities and/or religions. These hostilities, anchored as they are in the collective memory and history of conflict, have become subject to extensive legislation, with the criminalization of statements about history and violent pasts becoming more commonplace. 

This lecture series will explore the enigma of how what we write relates back to the experience of bodies, healthy and unwell. Our speakers will explore how the medical humanities build on and revise earlier notions of the “medical arts.” At stake are the problem of representation and the interpretation of cultural products, past and present, through medical models.

Coming To Terms With A Polarized Society "Strangers in Their Own Land: Where Do We Go From Here?" Arlie R. Hochschild, Professor of Sociology Emerita, University of California, Berkeley Panelists:  Frederick Harris, Dean of Social Sciences and Professor of Political Science, Columbia University Nicholas Lemann, Joseph Pulitzer II and Edith Pulitzer Moore Professor of Journalism and Dean Emeritus of the Faculty of Journalism, Columbia University; staff writer for the New Yorker

This book challenges the ways we read, write, store, and retrieve information in the digital age. Computers—from electronic books to smart phones—play an active role in our social lives. Our technological choices thus entail theoretical and political commitments. Dennis Tenen takes up today's strange enmeshing of humans, texts, and machines to argue that our most ingrained intuitions about texts are profoundly alienated from the physical contexts of their intellectual production. Drawing on a range of primary sources from both literary theory and software engineering, he makes a case for a more transparent practice of human–computer interaction. Plain Text is thus a rallying call, a frame of mind as much as a file format. It reminds us, ultimately, that our devices also encode specific modes of governance and control that must remain available to interpretation.

Airea D. Matthews’s first collection of poems, Simulacra, received the 2016 Yale Series of Younger Poets Award, chosen by Carl Phillips, who writes the book “offers us the poem as prose story, as an exchange of text messages with the dead, as collapsed opera, as Tweet, even as a possible mash-up of rap, litany, and Stein’s prosody,” which are all ways to enact “the ceaseless hunger that is the book’s thematic core.” She is a recipient of a 2016 Rona Jaffe Foundation Writers’ Award and an Assistant Professor of Creative Writing at Bryn Mawr College. D. A. Powell is the author of five collections, including Useless Landscape, or A Guide for Boys which received the National Book Critics Circle Award in poetry. “No accessible poet of his generation is half as original, and no poet as original is this accessible” (Stephen Burt). He is a Professor at University of San Francisco. Rachel Zucker is the author of nine books, most recently MOTHERs, a memoir, and The Pedestrians, a double collection of poetry and prose. “Her poems read like skin-of-your-teeth escapes from impending disaster”; and as mediations on time, they focus “on one of its most heartbreaking dilemmas: how to be in the moment when all you can think about is the nostalgia you’ll feel for it once it’s over. Poetry as a temporal acrobatics, outwitting distraction” (Dan Chiasson). She teaches poetry at NYU and is the host of the podcast Commonplace: Conversations with Poets (and Other People).

4/13 | #BLACKLIVESMATTER

Coming To Terms With A Polarized Society "Professional Journalism, Polarization, Post-Truth, and Post-Trump" Michael Schudson, Professor of Journalism, Columbia University. Panelists: Leonard Downie, Jr., Weil Family Professor of Journalism, Arizona State University; Former Executive Editor, Washington Post Bill Keller, Editor-in-Chief, The Marshall Project; Former Executive Editor, New York Times

Various panels will convene on two campuses in Dublin and New York City to discuss the current political climate. The first portion of the event (November 6-7) will take place at Trinity, College Dublin and the second portion (November 9-10) will be at Columbia.

"Over the Rainbow" exploded into worldwide fame upon its performance by Judy Garland in the MGM film musical The Wizard of Oz (1939). Voted the greatest song of the twentieth century in a 2000 survey, it is a masterful, delicate balance of sophistication and child-like simplicity in which composer Harold Arlen and lyricist E. Y. "Yip" Harburg poignantly captured the hope and anxiety harbored by Dorothy's character. 

On November 14, research scholar Cristiana Grigore will officially launch the Roma People’s Project (RPP) at Columbia University in collaboration with the Heyman Center for the Humanities. With support from the Center for Justice at Columbia, this initiative will spotlight the Roma people and expand Roma studies by examining topics such as identity and stigma, mobility and displacement, and archival research and digital scholarship. 

The interconnections of migration, law, bureaucracy and race form the subject of some of the most exciting current research into the Nazis in history. The American roots of National Socialism are explored by James Whitman, one of tonight’s speakers and author of a study of the influences exerted upon the Third Reich by interwar US immigration laws. Alongside Whitman, Hans-Christian Jasch will speak about new insights to be gleaned into the emergence of the wartime German genocide through a focus on the careers, personalities and intellectual outlooks of the civil servants who participated in the Wannsee Conference, a key turning-point in the Final Solution of the Jewish Question. 

A major American poet of the twentieth century, Gwendolyn Brooks is a writer of great formal mastery and intimate observation, most beautifully of the Chicago communities she writes of, the people who make “a sugar of/The malocclusions, the inconditions of love.” 

Everyone seems to be writing on populism these days, which is unsurprising given the global rise of populist movements, parties, and leaders. But the relationship of populism to religion remains understudied. In response, IRCPL has organized a three-part speaker series on Populism and Religion. With this series, we aim to illuminate the broad yet distinctive nature of populism(s) by analyzing their region-specific histories, the religious posturing of populist groups on both sides of the political spectrum, and the unique rhetorics used by populist movements to appeal to the general public.

New Books in the Arts & Sciences: panel discussions celebrating recent work by the Columbia Faculty. At Home In The World by Maria DiBattista and Deborah Nord & Reading Jane Austen by Jenny Davidson

Orhan Pamuk

Monday, November 20, 2017

Orhan Pamuk reads from his new novel, The Red-Haired Woman, followed by a conversation with Bruce Robbins, English and Comparative Literature

Roundtable on Maya Jasanoff's "The Dawn Watch: Joseph Conrad in a Global World"

5/13 | SATYAGRAHA

We are all familiar with the many bromides teaching us the value of failure on the path to success. It builds character, shows perseverance and dedication, demonstrates willingness to take a risk, and so forth. All perhaps true, but all constrained by a view of failure as a means to an end, an unfortunately necessary obstacle to be overcome. One may learn from failures, but what is mostly meant is that one learns not to do that particular thing again. Failing is fine, especially on someone else’s dime, if you gain some experience to avoid future failures.

This lecture series will explore the enigma of how what we write relates back to the experience of bodies, healthy and unwell. Our speakers will explore how the medical humanities build on and revise earlier notions of the “medical arts.” At stake are the problem of representation and the interpretation of cultural products, past and present, through medical models

6/13 | REVOLT: FOUCAULT IN IRAN

7/13 | DISOBEDIENCE

8/13 | BREAKING SILENCE

9/13 | THE BODY AND TROUBLE

Sites of Religious Memory in an Age of Exodus - Central Mediterranean

10/13 | ANTI-IMPERIALISM/INDEPENDENCE

11/13 | HACKTIVISM

12/13 | STANDING GROUND/STANDING ROCK

13/13 | COUNTERREVOLUTION

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