LES HISTORIENNES

Monday, October 8, 2018 - Friday, October 12, 2018 Maison Francaise

LES HISTORIENNES:  a series of special events with Jeanne Balibar and three French historians who inspired Jeanne Balibar’s performance of “Les Historiennes” at FIAF on October 13

MONDAY, OCTOBER 8, 7:00-8:30 P.M.

Writing History from a Crime: The Violette Nozière Case

Anne-Emmanuelle Demartini, in conversation with Stephane Gerson

Talk in French with English translation

In the summer of 1933, in Paris, an 18-year old woman poisoned her parents and the crime became a great cause célèbre of the interwar era. This talk will present a new interpretation of a famous French patricide and further explore the writing of history from a judicial case: the social imaginary and its mechanisms as revealed through micro-history.

Anne-Emmanuelle Demartini is Professor of History at University of Paris 13 and the author of Violette Nozière, la fleur du mal: Une histoire des années trente (2017). Her areas of research interest include the social imagination and the history of emotion, and the history of crime and its representations.

Stéphane Gerson is Professor of French and French Studies and the Director of the Institute of French Studies at NYU.

Event made possible with support from the Institut Français. 

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 10, 6-7:30 P.M.

Marriage and Slavery in the Early Portuguese Atlantic World

Charlotte de Castelnau-L’Estoile, in conversation with Amy Chazkel and Natasha Lightfoot

Marriage played a crucial role in the making of a Catholic slavery-based society such as that of Brazil from the 16th century to the 19th century. Historical sources such as legal documents and petitions from slaves can shed light on the topic. In this Catholic world, marriage was accessible to slaves, in theory at least, without their master’s permission. The point is to understand how the ecclesiastical institution made possible some marital freedom within the slavery system and how slaves used this real but limited right to claim some area of autonomy. Attentive to slaves’ voices, this lecture is an invitation to think about the functioning of the long-standing slavery-based Brazilian society, developed between Africa, America and Europe.

Charlotte de Castelnau is Professor of Early Modern History at the Université de Paris 7 – Diderot.  Her research interests include the history of slavery and the history of Catholicism in the modern era.

Amy Chazkel is Associate Professor of History at CUNY Graduate Center. Natasha Lightfoot is Associate Professor of History at Columbia.

Event co-sponsored by the Columbia Maison Française and the Society of Fellows and Heyman Center for the Humanities.  Made possible with support from the Institut Français.

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 11, 6-7:30 P.M.

Biography and the Social Sciences: the Case of Claude Lévi-Strauss

Emmanuelle Loyer, in conversation with Emmanuelle Saada and Camille Robcis

In French, with English translation

Biography, a genre which has long been considered illegitimate as historiography, can be considered today as a laboratory for the writing of the social sciences, including, paradoxically, a way of understanding the social sciences themselves.  Drawing on her recently published, critically acclaimed biography of Claude Lévi-Strauss, Emmanuelle Loyer discusses Lévi-Strauss through the double lenses of biography and the social sciences.

Emmanuelle Loyer is Professor of Contemporary History at Sciences Po Paris. Her books include Paris à New York, Intellectuels et artistes français en exil, 1940-1947 ; Mai 68 dans le texte; and Lévi-Strauss, for which she won the Prix Femina in 2015.  It is being released in English translation as Lévi-Strauss: A Biography by Wiley in October 2018.

Emmanuelle Saada is Professor of French and History at Columbia.

Camille Robcis is Associate Professor of French and History at Columbia.

Event co-sponsored by the Columbia Maison Française and Alliance Program.  Event made possible with support from the Cultural Services of the French Embassy

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 12, 1-3 P.M.

Women’s voices, women’s stories: Jeanne Balibar in conversation with historians Anne-Emmanuelle Demartini, Emmanuelle Loyer, and Charlotte de Castelnau-L’Estoile, moderated by Emmanuelle Saada

In French, with English translation

Violette Nozière, the criminal, Delphine Seyrig, the actress, Páscoa, the slave.  French actress Jeanne Balibar grapples with these three figures in a roundtable conversation with three French historians who have researched and written about their lives. Jeanne Balibar will be performing excerpts of the women’s stories in a performance called “Les Historiennes” at FIAF on October 13, and this conversation provides an opportunity for her to converse with the historians, Anne-Emmanuelle Demartini, Emmanuelle Loyer, and Charlotte de Castelnau-L’Estoile, who gave shape to these three women’s histories.  They discuss how to give voice to these women from the past, how to narrate – and perform -- their stories and histories. Through a discussion about the destinies of these three women, and their different experiences of emancipation, however paradoxical, we get a glimpse into the ways historians write about, and actresses perform, the lives of women from the past.  This intimate conversation among friends also offers a portrait of Jeanne Balibar’s craft as an actress and their craft as historians of the same generation.

Jeanne Balibar is a celebrated French actress and singer whose 2017 performance in Barbara earned her a César Award for Best Actress.  Her many other films include The Duchess of Langeais (2007), All the Fine Promises (2003), and My Sex Life … or How I Got Into an Argument (1996).

Event co-sponsored by the Columbia Maison Française, Society of Fellows and Heyman Center for the Humanities, Alliance Program, and French Institute Alliance Française. Event made possible with support from the Institut Français and Cultural Services of the French Embassy.  

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