Fall 2006

Saturday, September 2, 2006

"World Literature: In a World Globalized and Unequal" AIJAZ AHMAD is Professorial Fellow at the Nehru Memorial Museum and Library in New Delhi, India, and Professor of Political Science at York University in Ontario, Canada. He is the author of Lineages of the Present: Ideological and Political Genealogies of Contemporary South Asia, and is an editor, with Fred Pfeil and Modhumita Roy, of the collection A Singular Voice: Collected Writings of Michael Sprinker.

Wednesday, September 13, 2006

Natalie Zemon Davis, one of the finest and most creative historians of the early modern world, and author of The Return of Martin Guerre (1983) comes to the Heyman Center to discuss her most recent publication, Trickster Travels: A Sixteenth-Century Muslim Between Worlds (Hill and Wang, 2006). Her other recent books include The Gift in Sixteenth-Century France (2000); Slaves on Screen: Film and Historical Vision (2000), and L'histoire tout feu tout flamme. Entretiens avec Denis Crouzet (2004). Natalie Zemon Davis is Henry Charles Lea Professor of History Emerita at Princeton University and is currently adjunct professor of History and Medieval Studies and a Senior Fellow in the Centre for Comparative Literature at the University of Toronto. Sanjay Subrahmanyam is Professor and Doshi Chair of Indian History at UCLA, and also Director of UCLA's Center for India and South Asia. Earlier he has taught at Delhi, Paris and Oxford. He is most recently the author (with Muzaffar Alam) of Indo-Persian Travels in the Age of Discoveries, 1400-1800 (Cambridge, 2006), and of a number of other books including The Career and Legend of Vasco da Gama (Cambridge, 1997).

Monday, September 18, 2006

To register for this event only, please visit www.worldleaders.columbia.edu>. Making Globalization Work In conjunction with the World Leaders Forum, the Committee on Global Thought, and the Initiative for Policy Dialogue. A discussion with distinguished panelists on solutions for some of the world's most pressing problems, such as debt, unfair trade, the "resource curse," the need to curb harmful emissions and world poverty. Hosted by Columbia University President Lee C. Bollinger and moderated by Tina Rosenberg, editorial writer for the New York Times. Nobel Prize-winning economist Joseph E. Stiglitz, University Professor at Columbia University, chair of Columbia University's Committee on Global Thought, is the author of Making Globalization Work, the sequel to Globalization and Its Discontents, which sold more than one million copies. Panelists include Nancy Birdsall, president of the Center for Global Development, and George Soros, founder and chairman of the Open Society Institute and chairman of Soros Fund Management LLC. Seating is limited, registration is required.

Monday, October 2, 2006

"World Literature: In a World Globalized and Unequal" AIJAZ AHMAD is Professorial Fellow at the Nehru Memorial Museum and Library in New Delhi, India, and Professor of Political Science at York University in Ontario, Canada. He is the author of Lineages of the Present: Ideological and Political Genealogies of Contemporary South Asia, and is an editor, with Fred Pfeil and Modhumita Roy, of the collection A Singular Voice: Collected Writings of Michael Sprinker. Adrienne Rich is the author of nearly twenty volumes of poetry, including The School Among the Ruins: Poems 2000-2004, which won the National Book Critics Circle Award.

Thursday, October 5, 2006

BREAKING OPEN: CELEBRATING THE LIFE AND WORK OF MURIEL RUKEYSER With Suzanne Gardinier, Jan Heller Levi, Adrienne Rich & Hugh Seidman At Davis Auditorium, Schapiro Center, Columbia University (enter at 116th & Broadway) Admission Free Readings and discussion highlight the life and poetry of Muriel Rukeyser (1913-1980), visionary poet, political activist, and unparalleled voice in twentieth century American literature.

Sunday, October 8, 2006

First Run/Icarus Films is pleased to announce that OUT OF PLACE: MEMORIES OF EDWARD SAID will receive its U.S. theatrical premiere on October 11th at Anthology Film Archives in New York, at 32 Second Avenue. Borrowing its title from the author’s 2000 memoir, OUT OF PLACE traces the life and work of Edward Said (1935-2003), the Palestinian-born intellectual who wrote widely on history, literature, music, philosophy and politics. Filmed in Palestine, Israel, Lebanon, Egypt, and the U.S., OUT OF PLACE traces Said’s childhood influences and investigates his intellectual legacy, especially the importance of his work in literary criticism and postcolonial studies, his love of music, his role on the Palestine National Council, his troubled relationship with Yasir Arafat, and his position as the most articulate spokesperson for the Palestinian cause in the United States. A First Run/Icarus Films Release / Produced by Siglo, Ltd., Tokyo, Japan Directed by Makoto Sato / Produced by Yamagami Tetsujiro / Music by Daniel Barenboim 138 mins. / Color and B&W / 2005 / English, Arabic and Hebrew with English Subtitles

Tuesday, October 10, 2006

"Politics and Academic Freedom" STANLEY FISH, Davidson-Kahn Distinguished University Professor of Humanities and Law at the College of Law at Florida International University. He previously served as Dean of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences at the University of Illinois at Chicago. He holds a B.A. from the University of Pennsylvania (1959) and an M.A. and Ph.D. from Yale University (1960; 1962). He has previously taught at the University of California at Berkeley (1962-74); Johns Hopkins University (1974-85), where he was the Kenan Professor of English and Humanities; and Duke University, where he was Arts and Sciences Professor of English and Professor of Law (1986-1998). From 1993 through 1998 he served as Executive Director of Duke University Press. Dr. Fish served as a Distinguished Visiting Professor at The John Marshall Law School from 2000 through 2002.

Wednesday, October 11, 2006

Stanley Fish, Davidson-Kahn Distinguished University Professor of Humanities and Law at the College of Law at Florida International University. He previously served as Dean of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences at the University of Illinois at Chicago. He holds a B.A. from the University of Pennsylvania (1959) and an M.A. and Ph.D. from Yale University (1960; 1962). He has previously taught at the University of California at Berkeley (1962-74); Johns Hopkins University (1974-85), where he was the Kenan Professor of English and Humanities; and Duke University, where he was Arts and Sciences Professor of English and Professor of Law (1986-1998). From 1993 through 1998 he served as Executive Director of Duke University Press. Dr. Fish served as a Distinguished Visiting Professor at The John Marshall Law School from 2000 through 2002.

The Perils of Freedom in America" Respondents: Eric Foner and Saidiya Hartman Please note that seating, which is limited, will be on a first come first served basis. ORLANDO PATTERSON, John Cowles Professor of Sociology at Harvard University, received his Ph.D. in Sociology from the London School of Economics (1965). He began teaching at Harvard in 1969. His work has focused on the sociology of slavery and of freedom and on the problems of ethnicity and multiculturalism. Among his many books are: The Sociology of Slavery: Jamaica, 1655-1838 (1967), Ethnic Chauvinism: The Reactionary Impulse (1977), Slavery and Social Death: A Comparative Study (1982), Freedom: Freedom in the Making of Western Culture (1991), The Ordeal of Integration: Progress and Resentment in America's "Racial" Crisis (1997) and Rituals of Blood: The Consequences of Slavery in Two American Centuries (1998). He is also the author of three novels and numerous short stories. His many honors include The Sorokin Prize from the American Sociological Association, the Ralph Bunche Award of the American Political Science Association, and the National Book Award. He served as Special Advisor for Social Policy and Development to the Jamaican Prime Minister Michael Manley (1972-1980) and is a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

Tuesday, November 14, 2006 - Wednesday, November 15, 2006

On Tuesday, MacKinnon will speak on "Women's Status, Men's States", and on Wednesday she will give a seminar titled "Genocide's Sexuality."

Tuesday, November 14, 2006

A seminar on "Genocide's Sexuality" Catharine A. MacKinnon is a lawyer, teacher, writer, activist, and expert on sex equality. She has a B.A. from Smith College (1968), a J.D. from Yale Law School (1977), and a Ph.D. in political science from Yale University Graduate School (1987). She has been Professor of Law at the University of Michigan Law School since 1990, and Visiting Professor of Law at the University of Chicago Law School since Fall 1997. She has taught at Yale, harvard, Stanford, Minnesota, UCLA, University of Chicago, Osgoode Hall (Toronto), and the University of Basel (Switzerland).

Wednesday, November 29, 2006

Nobel Laureate Orhan Pamuk and Columbia University President Lee Bollinger in conversation.

Wednesday, September 26, 2007

Seamus Deane, Michael Fried, Marina Warner, Maynard Solomon, and Michael Wood join a panel discussion of Edward Said's posthumous publication, On Late Style: Music and Literature Against the Grain (April, 2006). This event will be presented in collaboration with Pantheon Books.

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