Fall 2008

What Was Democracy in America?

Monday, September 22, 2008

The Heyman Center has planned a series of events on 'What Was Democracy?' with a view to studying the evolution of democratic ideas and culture.

The Arabic poet, Adonis, will read his poems to remember Edward Said on the fifth anniversary of his death.

Benedict Anderson, Aaron L. Binenkorb Professor Emeritus of International Studies, Government, and Asian Studies at Cornell University, is the author of Imagined Communities and a fine historian and theorist of nationalism. He will speak on the subject of cosmoplitanism.

Writer, journalist, political analyst, playwright, and filmmaker Andre Vltchek wrote and produced the documentary Terlena: The Breaking of a Nation, a documentary about the destruction of Indonesian intellectuals after the 1965 US-backed military coup in Indonesia.

This Conference will feature Louis Menand, Jonathan Arac, Steven Marcus, Geraldine Murphy, John Rosenberg, George Stade, Fritz Stern, and Michael Wood.

Reasons of Justice

Tuesday, October 7, 2008

Economist and philosopher Amartya Sen won the 1998 Nobel Prize in Economics. He will speak on "Reasons of Justice."

Who Do You Think You Are?: Feminist Memoirs

Wednesday, October 8, 2008

Lynne Segal, Anniversary Professor of Psychology & Gender Studies at Birkbeck, University of London, and one of the most interesting feminist theorists in the world, will speak on feminist memoirs.

From Barbarism to Civil Society

Wednesday, October 15, 2008

One of England's greatest historians, and author of Religion and the Decline of Magic, Keith Thomas will speak on the topic "From Barbarism to Civil Society."

Manners and Their Social Implications

Thursday, October 16, 2008

One of England's greatest historians, and author of Religion and the Decline of Magic, Keith Thomas will speak on the topic "Manners and Their Social Implications."

Martin Jay, Sidney Hellman Ehrman Professor of History at The University of California, Berkeley, will deliver the Fall 2008 Trilling Lecture.

The Function and Fate of Teleology in the Enlightenment—a two-day conference

Friday, October 24, 2008 - Saturday, October 25, 2008

It is the goal of this conference to study the role of teleological figures of thought and of the critique of teleology in the study of nature, aesthetics, political philosophy, anthropology, psychology and history.

Spinoza in His Time and Ours

Monday, October 27, 2008

Susan James, Professor of Philosophy at Birkbeck University of London and editor and author of numerous publications, and Jonathan Israel, Modern European History Professor at the Institute for Advanced Study and author of numerous books, including Enlightenment Contested, will assess the continuing relevance of Spinoza and how his political thought might still speak to us today.

An Election Post-Mortem

Wednesday, November 5, 2008

Hendrik Hertzberg, Senior Editor and Staff Writer for The New Yorker magazine, and Katha Pollitt, columnist for The Nation, will conduct a post mortem on the previous day's presidential election. This event is expected to be a full house, so please come early to ensure a seat.

Nobel Laureate Orhan Pamuk speaks with Andreas Huyssen, Villard Professor of German and Comparative Literature, Columbia University.

What is Enchantment?

Monday, November 17, 2008

The philosopher Charles Taylor, winner of both the Templeton Prize and the Kyoto Prize, will speak about his new and controversial book, A Secular Age in two lectures. The topic for this evening will be "What is Enchantment?".

A Genealogy of Liberty

Tuesday, November 18, 2008

Quentin Skinner, Regius Professor of Modern History at Cambridge University, and England's great intellectual historian of political thought of the Cambridge School, will follow up on previous talks given by members of that school at the Heyman Center: J.G.A pocock and John Dunn. Skinner will explore changing notions of freedom in the history of politics.

The Secular Age in a Global Context

Wednesday, November 19, 2008

The philosopher Charles Taylor, winner of both the Templeton Prize and the Kyoto Prize, will speak about his new and controversial book, A Secular Age in two lectures. The topic for this evening will be "The Secular Age in a Global Context."

Art Spiegelman is back. The brilliant cartoonist and Pulitzer Prize-winning author of the graphic novel Maus will speak in his engaging, brilliant way about comics with David Hajdu, the author of the recent much-praised book on comics, The Ten-Cent Plague as well as an earlier book on Bob Dylan, Joan Baez and their circle.

Events

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