Fall 2013

Monday, September 16, 2013

Ai Weiwei is China's most famous international artist and its most outspoken domestic critic. Against a backdrop of strict censorship and an unresponsive legal system, Ai expresses himself and organizes people through art and social media. In response, Chinese authorities have shut down his blog, beat him up, bulldozed his newly built studio, and held him in secret detention.   

Tuesday, September 17, 2013

Women Creating Change, a global initiative of the Center for the Study of Social Difference, presents director, writer, and producer Mira Nair (Salaam Bombay, Monsoon Wedding, The Namesake, and The Reluctant Fundamentalist) in conversation with Mabel Wilson (Columbia Graduate School of Architecture, Planning, and Preservation) and Anupama Rao (Barnard Department of History). Lila Abu-Lughod, Director of the Center for the Study of Social Difference, will moderate.

The Neuroscience and History Working Group talks foster interdisciplinary conversation about the promises and challenges of contemporary neuroscience.

Monday, September 23, 2013

On the tenth anniversary of the passing of Professor Edward Said, Columbia University hosts an event to reflect on his legacy with four speakers and film screenings

Monday, September 23, 2013

Evidence of chemical weapons use in Syria, and the following push for humanitarian intervention, raise questions about the practicality and legitimacy of military intervention on moral grounds.

For the Embodiments of Science lecture series, the Institute for Research on Women and Gender and the Heyman Center for the Humanities present a talk by Professor Evelyn Fox Keller, Professor of the History and Philosophy of Science, Emerita at Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Wednesday, September 25, 2013 - Tuesday, October 22, 2013

The Sheltering Word represents an artist’s quest to explore the healing and protective power of the written word as a specific cultural idiom and takes the form of a dialogue between Greek and North African cultures.

Friday, September 27, 2013

Christian Delage, historian and filmmaker, will discuss film recordings of WWII and Nazi concentration camps and the screening of those recordings.

Saturday, September 28, 2013

Asian American Alliance and Club Zamana present "The Beautiful, Rowdy Prisoners" a Hip-Hop Set by Chee Malabar

Monday, September 30, 2013

Professor Lindenberger will talk about East German term "havarien" that serves to illuminate history of Cold War East Germany as an incessant sequel of technological and human disasters. "Havarien" is a frequent key word in finding aids of the communist archives of East Germany, whether they come from the infamous Stasi (the secret police), the communist party, or the official trade union. 

Wednesday, October 2, 2013 - Thursday, October 3, 2013

The Heyman Center for Humanities and the center for Hellenic Studies at Columbia presents two evenings of film screenings and discussion with Greek filmmakers, Constantine Giannaris and Eva Stefani.    

Thursday, October 3, 2013

The Heyman Center for Humanities and the center for Hellenic Studies at Columbia presents two evenings of film screenings and discussion with Greek filmmakers, Constantine Giannaris and Eva Stefani.

Monday, October 7, 2013

What can the historical and intellectual geography of post-War development thinking teach us about the realities of global inequality today? Are there alternatives to the standard approaches of left and right in formulating a post-2015 development agenda: one fit for a world of emerging powers and persistent poverty?

Tuesday, October 8, 2013

This talk is a prolegomena to Macpherson's new book project, The Shape of Form, and asks: what do literary historians mean by "form"?

Tuesday, October 8, 2013

This panel is part of the CGT's Urgent Issues series exploring critical issues of global importance from a trans-regional and interdisciplinary perspective. It will examine the technical and global implications of the expanded surveillance capacity of states and the expanded capacity of people to contest.

Wednesday, October 9, 2013

We might have expected the severity of the crisis in Europe that opened in 2008 and intensified following fears of a Greek default in 2010 to have elicited a vibrant pan-European debate, with intellectuals playing an active role. In fact the circulation of ideas has been limited and intellectuals have not had much impact or succeeded in opening up new perspectives for the continent.

The Neuroscience and History Working Group talks foster interdisciplinary conversation about the promises and challenges of contemporary neuroscience. We will explore the historical conditions for the emergence of neuroscience as a discipline, as well as the synergies and tensions between historical and neuroscientific modes of explanation. We welcome scholars, clinicians, students, and the interested public.

Raja Shehadeh’s lecture on the 10th anniversary of Edward Said’s death will reflect on the cages of categorization that imprison Palestinians in contemporary Palestine perhaps more than even the physical matrix of borders, checkpoints, and the Wall.

Friday, October 18, 2013 - Saturday, October 19, 2013

In the early modern period, the emergence of travel as a means of information gathering on natural history, demography, government, and religion was accompanied by the use of questionnaires to orient observation. This conference investigates the development of techniques of information gathering of this kind and the networks on which they relied. Papers address the integral role of travel in the process of scientific exchange as well as to the ways that information itself traveled in British, French, Spanish, and Swedish contexts.

Tuesday, October 22, 2013

During the Second World War, three prominent members of the Frankfurt School--Franz Neumann, Herbert Marcuse, and Otto Kirchheimer--worked as intelligence analysts for the Office of Strategic Services, the wartime forerunner of the CIA. Secret Reports on Nazi Germany brings together their most important intelligence reports on Nazi Germany, most of them published for the first time.

Friday, October 25, 2013

Please join colleagues, admirers, and members of the Hobsbawm family for the New York memorial event celebrating the life and work of world-renowned historian Eric Hobsbawm (1917–2012). The afternoon of tributes and music will feature speakers Robin Blackburn, Victoria de Grazia, Barbara Fields, Eric Foner, Oz Frankel, Ira Katznelson, Will Milberg, Amartya Sen, and others. An informal reception will follow.

Will Self, author of many outstanding novels, including most recently, Umbrella (Grove Press, 2013) will appear in conversation with historian and Director of the Heyman Center for the Humanities, Mark Mazower.

Tuesday, October 29, 2013

Critics of the auteur theory tend to represent it as an awkward latecomer to the movie scene, an arriviste either willfully blind to, or else hopelessly out of touch with, the fundamentally collaborative nature of filmmaking.  But this view of auteur theory fails to account for its popularity from the early decades of the twentieth century, long before Truffaut formulated his version of it. During the twenties and thirties, for instance, Charlie Chaplin was regularly hailed as a one-man dynamo who "did everything" on his films.

Wednesday, October 30, 2013

The Center for Palestine Studies presents Judith Butler & Cornel West in conversation on the topic of "Palestine & The Public Intellectual: Honoring Edward Said." This event is now full but can be viewed on Livestream at this link. http://www.columbia.edu/cu/palestine/programs/featuredevent.html#livestream

Professor Vinay Gidwani will discuss his current work on labor processes and ecologies in agrarian and urban settings, as well as capitalist transformations of these environments. The talk will relate to his book project centered in Delhi called The Afterlives of Waste, which examines the spatial histories, political uses, and political economy of ‘waste’ as both commodity detritus and social excess.

A new reading and discussion group fostering interdisciplinary conversation about the promises and challenges of contemporary neuroscience. We will explore the historical conditions for the emergence of neuroscience as a discipline, as well as the synergies and tensions between historical and neuroscientific modes of explanation. We welcome scholars, clinicians, students, and the interested public.

Poets Tom Pickard, August Kleinzahler, and Maureen McLane will read from new and published work in the continuation of the Poets at the Heyman Center series.

Friday, November 8, 2013

Why do we continue to think of some books and authors as collectively constituting American literature? Why do we hold onto this idea that America has a literature and that certain authors--like William Faulkner or Nathaniel Hawthorne or Emily Dickinson--represent this concept of American literariness more than others? This talk will explore the global, often multi-modal networks through which American literature gains meaning and definition.

Tuesday, November 12, 2013

You are cordially invited to a lecture and reception presenting Akeel Bilgrami as the first Sidney Morgenbesser Professor of Philosophy. Professor Bilgrami will speak on the topic of Gandhi and (Marx).

This event has been moved to 304 Hamilton Hall, Columbia University. The drug war in the Americas faces two related crises: the dramatic wave of trafficker violence in Mexico and the rising challenge to U.S. strategies from a number of key Latin American states. Using the long history of hemispheric cocaine, Gootenberg will show how the sharply unintended impacts of prior U.S. drug interventions have brought the overseas drug war to this crossroads, and to the next phase of cocaine’s globalizing history.

Rayna Rapp, Professor of Anthropology at New York University, and Faye Ginsberg, David B. Kriser Professor of Anthropology at New York University, will present a talk titled, "Screening Disabilities: Visual Fields, Public Culture and the Atypical Mind in the 21st Century." The talk will be based on their work together on cultural innovation in special education in New York City and their work on brain research about learning, memory, childhood psychiatric diagnoses, and epigenetics. Kinship relations also lie at the heart of their project, and they are interviewing families across a wide array of social locations who have had the experience of having a child diagnosed with special educational categories and services. Michael Bérubé's talk as part of this event will focus on "Genotypes, Phenotypes, and Stereotypes," and the variability of "expression" in Down syndrome.

Mercantilism is a strange being with an awkward past. The concept ironically owes a far greater debt to its foremost critic, Adam Smith, than to any of its supposed advocates. And, while most recent scholarship agrees that the Wealth of Nations painted a deceptively coherent portrait of 17th-century political economy and the commercial regulations these ideas supposedly engendered, Smith’s interpretation of a “mercantile system” has survived, informing the way we conceive both of early modern history as well as the nature of modern economy and politics.

Tuesday, November 19, 2013

The Heyman Center presents a book release for Lynne Segal's newest title, Out of Time: The Pleasures and Perils of Ageing. In Out of Time: The Pleasures and the Perils of Ageing, leading thinker Lynne Segal examines her life and surveys the work and lives of other writers and artists to explore the pleasures and perils of growing old.  With great depth and humor, Segal proposes a much needed re-imagining of old age that does not fear the process of aging and challenges the taboos that constrain the lives of the aged.

Tuesday, November 19, 2013

The Committee on Global Thought presents Orhan Pamuk, Joseph LeDoux, and Partha Chatterjee in an interdisciplinary conversation bringing perspectives from literature, neuroscience, and history to explore the ways in which we understand, think about, and study the past.

Thursday, November 21, 2013

Poets Kimberly Johnson and Carl Phillips will read as part of the Barnard College Women Poets at Barnard series. The evening will also celebrate the long career of Anne Lake Prescott, Emerita Helen Goodhart Altschul Professor of English at Barnard College.

Friday, December 6, 2013 - Saturday, December 7, 2013

The aim of this conference is to situate Machiavelli within the history of political thought and examine the tragic view of politics and conflict in the The Prince. Discussion will focus on the relation between The Prince and the Discourses and the foundation of good orders, and the assessment of the meaning of political liberty and power in the study of Machiavelli’s ideas. To register for this conference please go to the Italian Academy Event Website.

Albert O. Hirschman, who died on December 10, 2012, was one of the most fascinating and versatile social scientists of the twentieth century. After fleeing Germany as a young opponent to the Nazi regime, he  moved across countries, languages, and disciplinary boundaries. He was a pioneer of development economics and other social sciences, to which he contributed with exemplary works on the analysis of the processes and mechanisms of political, economic, and social change.

Part of the Neuroscience and History Series: A new reading and discussion group fostering interdisciplinary conversation about the promises and challenges of contemporary neuroscience. We will explore the historical conditions for the emergence of neuroscience as a discipline, as well as the synergies and tensions between historical and neuroscientific modes of explanation. We welcome scholars, clinicians, students, and the interested public.  

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