Fall 2020

Book Launch for Testosterone: An Unauthorized Biography, by Rebecca M. Jordan-Young and Katrina Karkazis, with a response by Evelynn Hammonds

New Books in the Arts & Sciences: Celebrating Recent Work by Eliza Zingesser

New Books in the Arts & Sciences: Celebrating Recent Work by Victoria Rosner

The COVID-19 pandemic is the gravest infectious disease crisis the United States has faced since the Influenza pandemic of 1918, and we fear that it will not be the last. This panel will feature the work that a team of sociologists, oral historians, and anthropologists at Columbia University’s INCITE and the Oral History Archives at Columbia is developing to archive and document New York City’s experience of the pandemic.

13/13 Seminar Series
1/13 | ABOLITION TODAY

Thursday, September 24, 2020

Abolition 13/13 is the 6th 13/13 seminar series held over the course of the academic year at the Columbia Center for Contemporary Critical Thought. These seminars focus, each year, on a different set of topics at the heart of contemporary critical thought and action in philosophy, politics, law, and social inquiry. The seminar for 2020-2021 will focus on abolition today and will work through the different dimensions of contemporary arguments for abolition (regarding the prison, the police, and the death penalty, but also the abolition of property, of capital, of coverture and marital dominion, of oil, and of borders). It will consider the history of the abolition of slavery and the lessons to be learned. It will explore the many arguments for different forms of abolition.

The Perfect Fascist (Harvard University Press, 2020) tells the story of Attilio Teruzzi, an Italian army officer who became a commander of the Blackshirts and a colonial administrator under Mussolini. The book analyzes, through Teruzzi's career and personal history, the inner workings of Italian fascism. It also explores the issues of ultra-nationalism, strong men, and racial conflict, which remain sadly relevant in today's political discourse.  

New Books in the Arts & Sciences: Celebrating Recent Work by Mana Kia

New Books in the Arts & Sciences: Celebrating Recent Work by Claudia Breger

New Books in the Arts & Sciences: Celebrating Recent Work by Bernard Harcourt

Roy Foster “On Seamus Heaney”

Wednesday, October 14, 2020

Join us for an online conversion with Professor Roy Foster about his new book, On Seamus Heaney (Princeton University Press, 2020). Published this fall, On Seamus Heaney is a vivid and original account of one of Ireland’s greatest poets by an acclaimed Irish historian and literary biographer. Professor Foster will be in conversation with NYU's Dr. Kelly Sullivan. 

Abolition 13/13 is the 6th 13/13 seminar series held over the course of the academic year at the Columbia Center for Contemporary Critical Thought. These seminars focus, each year, on a different set of topics at the heart of contemporary critical thought and action in philosophy, politics, law, and social inquiry. The seminar for 2020-2021 will focus on abolition today and will work through the different dimensions of contemporary arguments for abolition (regarding the prison, the police, and the death penalty, but also the abolition of property, of capital, of coverture and marital dominion, of oil, and of borders). It will consider the history of the abolition of slavery and the lessons to be learned. It will explore the many arguments for different forms of abolition.

  A Medical Disaster and its Aftermaths: The Quest for Sleeping Sickness Eradication in Colonial Africa A talk by Guillaume Lachenal, moderated by Thomas Dodman

“Apocalypse Pending: Religion, Politics, and Social Media” explores the growing popularity of conspiracy thinking in our current moment and its place in the history of religious movements, particularly in the US context.  It considers how new media technologies have made it possible for the dissemination of such thinking on a scale unimaginable in the past, how the moral panic it generates is impacting social and political life worldwide, and whether there are measures available to control its spread or mitigate its effects. 

On the Edge of the Settled World

Thursday, October 22, 2020

Led by anthropologist, Rosalind Morris, the CGT project on Unsettlement aims to enable critical thought and a just response to issues that transcend the category of migrancy and the issues of border security. Beyond the false dichotomy of voluntary or forced movement, in areas where border regimes are mutating and climate change is precipitating profound demographic shifts, the project brings together scholars, policy makers, journalists and artists in forums that aim to inform and to foster new approaches to the challenges of our present and the future.

New Books in the Arts & Sciences: Celebrating Recent Work by Deborah Paredez

“Apocalypse Pending: Religion, Politics, and Social Media” explores the growing popularity of conspiracy thinking in our current moment and its place in the history of religious movements, particularly in the US context.  It considers how new media technologies have made it possible for the dissemination of such thinking on a scale unimaginable in the past, how the moral panic it generates is impacting social and political life worldwide, and whether there are measures available to control its spread or mitigate its effects.  

Abolition 13/13 is the 6th 13/13 seminar series held over the course of the academic year at the Columbia Center for Contemporary Critical Thought. These seminars focus, each year, on a different set of topics at the heart of contemporary critical thought and action in philosophy, politics, law, and social inquiry. The seminar for 2020-2021 will focus on abolition today and will work through the different dimensions of contemporary arguments for abolition (regarding the prison, the police, and the death penalty, but also the abolition of property, of capital, of coverture and marital dominion, of oil, and of borders). It will consider the history of the abolition of slavery and the lessons to be learned. It will explore the many arguments for different forms of abolition.

Feed the Fire: A Cyber Symposium in Honor of Geri Allen celebrates the work of the late pianist, composer, improvisor, and educator and serves as a launch for a special issue of the journal Jazz and Culture, “The Power of Geri Allen.” Feed the Fire focuses on Allen’s work in music as a performer, composer, teacher, activist, and mentor, and features a keynote event with Terri Lyne Carrington (Berklee College of Music), Angela Davis (University of California, Santa Cruz), Gina Dent (University of California, Santa Cruz), and Farah Jasmine Griffin (Columbia University).

The US Election: Perspectives and Prospects

Thursday, November 5, 2020

This online panel discussion will review the outcome of the US election, the major issues that have faced the electorate in 2020, the campaign, and ways forward for the country. 

New Books in the Arts & Sciences: Celebrating Recent Work by Elleni Centime Zeleke

Abolition Democracy 13/13 is the 6th 13/13 seminar series held over the course of the academic year at the Columbia Center for Contemporary Critical Thought. These seminars focus, each year, on a different set of topics at the heart of contemporary critical thought and action in philosophy, politics, law, and social inquiry. The seminar for 2020-2021 will focus on abolition today and will work through the different dimensions of contemporary arguments for abolition (regarding the prison, the police, and the death penalty, but also the abolition of property, of capital, of coverture and marital dominion, of oil, and of borders). It will consider the history of the abolition of slavery and the lessons to be learned. It will explore the many arguments for different forms of abolition.

New Books in the Arts & Sciences: Celebrating Recent Work by Casey Blake, Daniel H. Borus, and Howard Brick

Aesthetics and Politics in 2020: A Workshop

Thursday, November 12, 2020 - Saturday, November 14, 2020

On which grounds can we claim, in 2020 and with scholarly confidence, that a literary text has “progressive” or “right-wing” affinities? How does a live performance’s evidently intended critique of racist or homophobic dispositifs actually succeed (or fail)? What justifies the declaration that a film unfolds a revolutionary sensibility—or more pragmatically, contributes to working through unprecedented social crisis? Questions such as these could not be more topical today against the backdrop of new fascisms and heated public conflict in an age of heightened emergency and precarity, fear, anger, and hate. In the German context, resonant inquiries have flared up in recent debates around individual authors’ or texts’ uncanny proximities with rightwing movements but also in a resurgence of interests in (progressive, egalitarian, anti-fascist) activist political aesthetics. 

New Books in the Arts & Sciences: Celebrating Recent Work by Matthew Hart

New Books in the Arts & Sciences: Celebrating Recent Work by Mahmood Mamdani

New Books in the Arts & Sciences: Celebrating Recent Work by Eugenia Lean

Abolition 13/13 is the 6th 13/13 seminar series held over the course of the academic year at the Columbia Center for Contemporary Critical Thought. These seminars focus, each year, on a different set of topics at the heart of contemporary critical thought and action in philosophy, politics, law, and social inquiry. The seminar for 2020-2021 will focus on abolition today and will work through the different dimensions of contemporary arguments for abolition (regarding the prison, the police, and the death penalty, but also the abolition of property, of capital, of coverture and marital dominion, of oil, and of borders). It will consider the history of the abolition of slavery and the lessons to be learned. It will explore the many arguments for different forms of abolition.

Isaac Julien’s Looking for Langston at 30: A Film Screening and Roundtable Celebrating Queer Harlem, in support of Harlem Renaissance 100

Please join us for a film and discussion series on the impacts of gentrification, development, and other forms of spatial violence. The Public Humanities Initiative at the SOF/Heyman presents four events exploring architectural and territorial planning as instruments of violence, and the activists that seek to use visual and narrative storytelling as a way to reclaim spatial rights. The films we will highlight not only serve to reflect on the contemporary global context of spatial violence, they also serve as instances where artistic and humanistic production engage in spatial activism.

The Society of Fellows and Heyman Center for the Humanities is pleased to present Alisse Waterston and Charlotte Corden in conversation with Naeem Mohaiemen, Mellon Teaching Fellow in the Society of Fellows in the Humanities and Lecturer in Department of Anthropology and Institute for Comparative Literature & Society.

New Books in the Arts & Sciences: Celebrating Recent Work by Justin Clarke-Doane

13/13 Seminar Series
6/13 | ABOLISH CAPITAL

Thursday, December 17, 2020

Abolition 13/13 is the 6th 13/13 seminar series held over the course of the academic year at the Columbia Center for Contemporary Critical Thought. These seminars focus, each year, on a different set of topics at the heart of contemporary critical thought and action in philosophy, politics, law, and social inquiry. The seminar for 2020-2021 will focus on abolition today and will work through the different dimensions of contemporary arguments for abolition (regarding the prison, the police, and the death penalty, but also the abolition of property, of capital, of coverture and marital dominion, of oil, and of borders). It will consider the history of the abolition of slavery and the lessons to be learned. It will explore the many arguments for different forms of abolition.

In the month of November, two Category 4 hurricanes struck the Afro-Indigenous Moskitia region of Central America -- a region that was already in the throes of a COVID-19 outbreak. In this event, two Miskitu activists and one Afro-Creole political leader from the region reflect on the wider sociopolitical and economic context giving shape to the hurricanes and their aftermath.

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