Thursday, April 26, 2007  8:00pm Schermerhorn Hall, Room 501

Notes

Open and Free to Public

No Registration Required

Sponsors

The Philoctetes Center

Gerald Edelman, Nobel Prize winning scientist, and Lorraine Daston, Director of the Max Planck Institute for the History of Science in Berlin, Germany will discuss together, "The Origins of Norms: The Place of Value in a World of Nature," as part of a three day conference jointly sponsored with The Philoctetes Center.


For the complete conference schedule, please see the Philoctetes online calendar at http://www.philoctetes.org/calendar/.

The event will be held at 501 Schermerhorn Hall, Columbia University. It is free and open to the general public, and seating will be on a first come, first served basis. No tickets, no reservations are necessary.

Lorraine Daston is Director of the Max Planck Institute for the History of Science in Berlin. Her writing focuses on the history of probability and scientific objectivity. She is the author of Things that Talk: Object Lessons and Science, Biographies of Scientific Objects, and Classical Probability in the Enlightenment, which was awarded the Pfizer Prize. She has co-authored numerous books, including Wonders and the Order of Nature and Thinking with Animals: New Perspectives on Anthropomorphism.

Gerald Edelman is the founder and Director of The Neurosciences Institute, a non-profit research center in San Diego that studies the biological basis of higher brain functions, and separately is Chairman of the Department of Neurobiology at The Scripps Research Institute. He is the recipient of the 1972 Nobel Prize in Physiology and Medicine for his work on the immune system. His books include Second Nature: Brain Science and Human Knowledge, Wider than the Sky: The Phenomenal Gift of Consciousness, and Bright Air, Brilliant Fire: On the Matter of the Mind.

Participants

  • Gerald Edelman

    Chairman of the Department of Neurobiology

    The Scripps Research Institute

  • Lorraine Daston

    Director

    Max Planck Institute for the History of Science

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