Heyman Center Workshops

Neuroscience & History: Being Brains

Wednesday, March 5, 2014

Are we our brains? Or, more precisely: how and in what contexts have the claims that “we are our brains” or that “the mind is what the brain does” become naturalized to the point they have by the first decade of the 21st century?  

Around the year 2000, a massive conceptual mutation occurred in the neuronal sciences. After the brain had been a chemical, synaptic organ for almost half a century, a new way of thinking and knowing the nervous system emerged –– a biological and cellular way that Tobias Rees would like to call “after neurochemistry.”  

Part of the Neuroscience and History Series: A new reading and discussion group fostering interdisciplinary conversation about the promises and challenges of contemporary neuroscience. We will explore the historical conditions for the emergence of neuroscience as a discipline, as well as the synergies and tensions between historical and neuroscientific modes of explanation. We welcome scholars, clinicians, students, and the interested public.  

A new reading and discussion group fostering interdisciplinary conversation about the promises and challenges of contemporary neuroscience. We will explore the historical conditions for the emergence of neuroscience as a discipline, as well as the synergies and tensions between historical and neuroscientific modes of explanation. We welcome scholars, clinicians, students, and the interested public.

Professor Vinay Gidwani will discuss his current work on labor processes and ecologies in agrarian and urban settings, as well as capitalist transformations of these environments. The talk will relate to his book project centered in Delhi called The Afterlives of Waste, which examines the spatial histories, political uses, and political economy of ‘waste’ as both commodity detritus and social excess.

The Neuroscience and History Working Group talks foster interdisciplinary conversation about the promises and challenges of contemporary neuroscience. We will explore the historical conditions for the emergence of neuroscience as a discipline, as well as the synergies and tensions between historical and neuroscientific modes of explanation. We welcome scholars, clinicians, students, and the interested public.

The Neuroscience and History Working Group talks foster interdisciplinary conversation about the promises and challenges of contemporary neuroscience.

Subaltern Urbanism: Forms of Life

Friday, November 30, 2012

This Heyman Center Faculty Workshop on Subaltern Urbanism explores the "the urban" as a historic and contemporary form of life.

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