Public Humanities Initiative

Hosted by the Public Humanities Initiative at the Society of Fellows and Heyman Center for the Humanities at Columbia University, this Zoominar features the projects developed by our 2019-2020 Public Humanities Graduate Student Fellows over the course of the past year, followed by discussion with fellow scholars, community members, and civic partners. An interdisciplinary group of emerging scholars, these Public Humanities Fellows have worked both together and independently to implement projects that bridge humanistic thinking with civic engagement and social justice, scholarly research with public building and communication. They will discuss how their projects promote humanistic thinking beyond the university, from different disciplinary perspectives and through a variety of media, such as audio media and podcast producing, walking and mapping, and curatorial and pedagogical practices aimed at serving under-resourced communities.  They will also discuss the origins of their projects in a commitment to break out of academic silos, the challenges they faced in the recent foreclosure of public spheres, and their current thinking about the methods and urgency of the Public Humanities in these critical times—both in the public sphere and in the context of higher education. 

Meredith Tenhoor, Architectures of Care: French Theories and Institutions circa 1968

Hosted by the Public Humanities Initiative at the Society of Fellows and Heyman Center for the Humanities at Columbia University, this Zoominar features the projects developed by our 2019-2020 Public Humanities Graduate Student Fellows over the course of the past year, followed by discussion with fellow scholars, community members, and civic partners. An interdisciplinary group of emerging scholars, these Public Humanities Fellows have worked both together and independently to implement projects that bridge humanistic thinking with civic engagement and social justice, scholarly research with public building and communication. They will discuss how their projects promote humanistic thinking beyond the university, from different disciplinary perspectives and through a variety of media, such as audio media and podcast producing, walking and mapping, and curatorial and pedagogical practices aimed at serving under-resourced communities.  They will also discuss the origins of their projects in a commitment to break out of academic silos, the challenges they faced in the recent foreclosure of public spheres, and their current thinking about the methods and urgency of the Public Humanities in these critical times—both in the public sphere and in the context of higher education. 

Leslie Topp, From Seclusion to Self-Isolation: Uses and Perils of the Single Room Alexandre White, Epidemic Imaginaries: Disease and the Redrawing of the Polis

Hosted by the Public Humanities Initiative at the Society of Fellows and Heyman Center for the Humanities at Columbia University, this Zoominar features the projects developed by our 2019-2020 Public Humanities Graduate Student Fellows over the course of the past year, followed by discussion with fellow scholars, community members, and civic partners. An interdisciplinary group of emerging scholars, these Public Humanities Fellows have worked both together and independently to implement projects that bridge humanistic thinking with civic engagement and social justice, scholarly research with public building and communication. They will discuss how their projects promote humanistic thinking beyond the university, from different disciplinary perspectives and through a variety of media, such as audio media and podcast producing, walking and mapping, and curatorial and pedagogical practices aimed at serving under-resourced communities.  They will also discuss the origins of their projects in a commitment to break out of academic silos, the challenges they faced in the recent foreclosure of public spheres, and their current thinking about the methods and urgency of the Public Humanities in these critical times—both in the public sphere and in the context of higher education. 

Hosted by the Public Humanities Initiative at the Society of Fellows and Heyman Center for the Humanities at Columbia University, this Zoominar features the projects developed by our 2019-2020 Public Humanities Graduate Student Fellows over the course of the past year, followed by discussion with fellow scholars, community members, and civic partners. An interdisciplinary group of emerging scholars, these Public Humanities Fellows have worked both together and independently to implement projects that bridge humanistic thinking with civic engagement and social justice, scholarly research with public building and communication. They will discuss how their projects promote humanistic thinking beyond the university, from different disciplinary perspectives and through a variety of media, such as audio media and podcast producing, walking and mapping, and curatorial and pedagogical practices aimed at serving under-resourced communities.  They will also discuss the origins of their projects in a commitment to break out of academic silos, the challenges they faced in the recent foreclosure of public spheres, and their current thinking about the methods and urgency of the Public Humanities in these critical times—both in the public sphere and in the context of higher education. 

Recent research by Andrew Simpson and Anne Merritt has pointed to the important contribution of ambulances to the establishment of emergency medicine as a medical subspecialty from the 1960s in the United States. A great deal of attention on both sides of the Atlantic was devoted to transporting victims of road traffic accidents safely and quickly to the locations of emergency care, reflecting much broader anxieties about motor car use as a social problem. For the most part, this concern was framed as a dimension of urban inequality in that it adversely impacted city dwellers, where the levels of traffic congestion tended to be most acute. This paper draws on insights from critical mobilities studies to examine how physicians, ambulance service managers, and urban health planners sought to overcome obstacles to the efficient transport of accident victims that were posed by complex urban infrastructures.

Humans and microbes have always co-habited, and their relationship has had a profound influence on human history—especially in cities, the crossroads of the movements of people, goods, and germs. Dr. Rebecca Hayes Jacobs will discuss her work as co-curator of Germ City: Microbes and the Metropolis, a 2018 exhibition at the City Museum of New York that explored the complex story of the city's long battle against infectious disease—a fight involving government, urban planners, medical professionals, businesses, and activists.  Planned to mark the centennial of the Spanish Flu pandemic, the show was organized in collaboration with The New York Academy of Medicine and Wellcome as part of the latter's international project Contagious Cities, a multi-city research and public humanities porject that explored the interplay of people and pathogens in urban contexts.

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