Video / Audio  Columbia

Since Edward Said’s foundational work, Orientalism has been singled out for critique as the quintessential example of Western intellectuals’ collaboration with oppression. Controversies over the imbrications of knowledge and power and the complicity of Orientalism in the larger project of colonialism have been waged among generations of scholars. But has Orientalism come to stand in for all of the sins of European modernity, at the cost of neglecting the complicity of the rest of the academic disciplines?

General Conversation with: Don Robotham and David Scott

Autobiographical Reflections with: Honor Ford Smith, Performance, Decolonization and Life Stories: Sistren Theatre Collective and the Search for Radical Alternatives in the Present Brian Meeks, Reading the Seventies in a Different Stylie: Dub Poetry and the Urgency of Message

Sustaining Social Movements with: Kimberly Robinson-Walcott, “Black Man Time Now!” Race, Class, and Culture in 1970s Jamaica Rupert Lewis, The Jamaican Left: Dogmas, Theories, and Politics, 1974-1980

The Institute for Religion, Culture, and Public Life and the Society of Fellows and Heyman Center for the Humanities presents Part 3 of our Populism and Religion lecture series from Theda Skocpol (Professor of Government and Sociology at Harvard University).  

The Institute for Religion, Culture, and Public Life and the Society of Fellows and Heyman Center for the Humanities presents Part 2 of our Populism and Religion lecture series from Rogers Smith (Associate Dean for the Social Sciences and Professor of Political Science at UPenn).

About forty years ago, historians of women began to claim a place for their subject as a distinct scholarly field.  This movement emerged particularly powerfully in Britain, its early preoccupations and questions shaped by the Feminist Movement, the New Left, and especially by Thompsonian social history.  This conference will convene more than 30 historians to reflect on "The Moment of British Women's History."

Reading and discussion of Flores Forbes' new book Invisible Men: A Contemporary Slave Narrative in the Era of Mass Incarceration with author Flores A. Forbes, Kendall Thomas, Nash Professor of Law Columbia University, and Glenn E. Martin, Criminal Justice Reform Advocate. October 10, 2016. Sponsored by the Columbia Center for Justice, Center for the Study of Law and Culture, Heyman Center for the Humanities, and Columbia Center for Contemporary Critical Thought.