Video / Audio  Daniel Carey

Full Title: Fire, Water, Moon: Supplemental Seasons in a Time without Season. If the Anthropocene names the geological epoch defined by the radically destabilizing effects of human activity on geophysical processes, this talk asks about the continued relevance of other, relatively unchanged seasonal cycles and patterns of fluctuating intensities and regulated dearth and abundance (both cultural and geophysical). According to recent work on the Anthropocene, petro-extraction economies have messed up our relationship to the sun by liberating capital from dependence on the “yield of present photosynthesis” (Andreas Malm). At a time when climate scientists are declaring the end of “seasonality,” and when technology appears to have caught up with lyric’s power to expand and compress, accelerate and distort the diurnal rhythms determined by the earth’s relation to the sun, I turn toward the moon and the micro-seasons afforded by its monthly cycles as well as to other comparably stable, cultural modes of distributing abundance and scarcity across time. What is to be gained by opening up the concept of seasonality to these pluralizing, supplemental seasons within seasons, and what healing powers might they still afford?

Full Title: Beyond Mindfulness: Buddhism and Health in Historical Perspective As a set of disciplines, the humanities face the challenge of how to write about embodied experiences that resist easy verbal categorization such as illness, pain, and healing. The recent emergence of interdisciplinary frameworks such as narrative medicine goes some way to address these challenges. Yet conceptualizing a field of medical humanities also offers a broader umbrella under which to study the influence of medico-scientific ideas and practices on society. Whether by incorporating material culture such as medical artefacts, performing symptomatic readings of poems and novels, or excavating the implicit medical assumptions underlying auditory cultures, the approaches that emerge from a historiographical or interpretive framework are different from those coming from the physician’s black bag.

Full Title: Beyond Mindfulness: Buddhism and Health in Historical Perspective As a set of disciplines, the humanities face the challenge of how to write about embodied experiences that resist easy verbal categorization such as illness, pain, and healing. The recent emergence of interdisciplinary frameworks such as narrative medicine goes some way to address these challenges. Yet conceptualizing a field of medical humanities also offers a broader umbrella under which to study the influence of medico-scientific ideas and practices on society. Whether by incorporating material culture such as medical artefacts, performing symptomatic readings of poems and novels, or excavating the implicit medical assumptions underlying auditory cultures, the approaches that emerge from a historiographical or interpretive framework are different from those coming from the physician’s black bag.

Full title: The Whiteness of Bones: the Emergence of the Human Skeleton as a Commodity, 1500-1800 The human skeleton became an object—scientific, natural, artistic, and artisanal—in the period between the late 15th century and the late 18th century. While retaining its symbolic value, in this period the skeleton became essential both to anatomists and to artists as the bedrock of the human form. As a valued commodity, skeletons were bought and sold, and entered public and private collections. Anatomical manuals included instructions on their crafting. This talk will examine who owned skeletons, who used them, and who made them, and the fact that their origins as dead humans remained curiously unexpressed.

Full title: The Whiteness of Bones: the Emergence of the Human Skeleton as a Commodity, 1500-1800 The human skeleton became an object—scientific, natural, artistic, and artisanal—in the period between the late 15th century and the late 18th century. While retaining its symbolic value, in this period the skeleton became essential both to anatomists and to artists as the bedrock of the human form. As a valued commodity, skeletons were bought and sold, and entered public and private collections. Anatomical manuals included instructions on their crafting. This talk will examine who owned skeletons, who used them, and who made them, and the fact that their origins as dead humans remained curiously unexpressed.

"Religion, Capitalism, and the Rural White Working Class" with Jarod Roll, “Make Believe: White Workers and the Elusive Promise of Capitalism, " Molly Worthen,“Theologies of Evangelical Trumpism" and Whitney Dow, "The Whiteness Project"

"Religion, Capitalism, and the Rural White Working Class" with Jarod Roll, “Make Believe: White Workers and the Elusive Promise of Capitalism," Molly Worthen,“Theologies of Evangelical Trumpism," and Whitney Dow, "The Whiteness Project"

Highlights of “Ethnicity, Nationalism, and Democratic Futures” with Maria Abascal, “Anxiety and Backlash to the Changing Face of America (And What We Can Do About It), " Andreas Wimmer, “Ethnic Diversity, Nationalism, and Democracy, " Bruce Western, "Race and Citizenship in the Era of Mass Incarceration" and moderated by Jürgen Barkhoff