Video / Audio  Daniel Carey

Terrance Hayes is the author of several books of poetry, including How to Be Drawn; Lighthead, which won the 2010 National Book Award for poetry; Muscular Music, which won the Kate Tufts Discovery Award; and Hip Logic, winner of the 2001 National Poetry Series. A recipient of a fellowship from the MacArthur Foundation, he is a chancellor of the Academy of American Poets, poetry editor at New York Times Magazine, and Distinguished Writer in Residence at NYU.

The interconnections of migration, law, bureaucracy and race form the subject of some of the most exciting current research into the Nazis in history. The American roots of National Socialism are explored by James Whitman, one of tonight’s speakers and author of a study of the influences exerted upon the Third Reich by interwar US immigration laws. Alongside Whitman, Hans-Christian Jasch will speak about new insights to be gleaned into the emergence of the wartime German genocide through a focus on the careers, personalities and intellectual outlooks of the civil servants who participated in the Wannsee Conference, a key turning-point in the Final Solution of the Jewish Question.

The Institute for Religion, Culture, and Public Life and the Society of Fellows and Heyman Center for the Humanities presents Part 1 of our Populism and Religion lecture series from Jose Casanova (Professor of Sociology and Theology, Georgetown University). . 

The Institute for Religion, Culture, and Public Life and the Society of Fellows and Heyman Center for the Humanities presents Part 3 of our Populism and Religion lecture series from Theda Skocpol (Professor of Government and Sociology at Harvard University).  

The Institute for Religion, Culture, and Public Life and the Society of Fellows and Heyman Center for the Humanities presents Part 2 of our Populism and Religion lecture series from Rogers Smith (Associate Dean for the Social Sciences and Professor of Political Science at UPenn).

About forty years ago, historians of women began to claim a place for their subject as a distinct scholarly field.  This movement emerged particularly powerfully in Britain, its early preoccupations and questions shaped by the Feminist Movement, the New Left, and especially by Thompsonian social history.  This conference will convene more than 30 historians to reflect on "The Moment of British Women's History."

Sahar Ishtiaque Ullah is a Ph.D. candidate in Arabic and Comparative Literature at Columbia University where she teaches and is completing her dissertation on the role of the erotic prelude in medieval Arabic-Islamic poetics. Her research interests also include the classical in contemporary Arabic literature and representations of Muslims in late medieval and early modern European literature. As a Public Humanities Fellow, Sahar will curate an interactive public arts project that includes the works of Muslim storytellers, poets, and visual artists with a special attention to North American minorities and immigrants with roots from regions largely portrayed as conflict zones in U.S. media outlets. 

Natacha Nsabimana is currently pursuing a Ph.D. in anthropology at Columbia University. Her dissertation is concerned with the everyday aftermath of violence in post-genocide Rwanda. It examines the ways in which the violence of the genocide against Tutsi occupies the spatial memory of Rwanda's landscape and the kinds of individual and national narratives such memory allows and disavows. Her project will engage young women at the Rose M Singer Center for Women on Rikers Island to produce a literary journal discussing social justice issues such as racism, slavery, incarceration and sexual violence through the prism of art. This project expands on existing programs developed by the Justice in Education Initiative at Columbia University, a collaboration between the Center for Justice and the Heyman Center for the Humanities.