Video / Audio  Heyman Center

Special Panel during The Wire two-day conference: Actors and Activism, Saturday April 9th 2016. The Wire leads Jamie Hector (Marlo Stanfield), Felicia Pearson (Snoop), Wendell Pierce (Bunk Moreland), and Sonja Sohn (Kima Greggs) speak on their community activism.  

This is the first panel of the two-day conference (April 8-9, 2016) on the popular television series The Wire, hosted by the Heyman Center for the Humanities at Columbia University. This panel is titled "Teaching The Wire" and featured Frances Bartkowski, Rutgers University-Newark, Marcellus Blount, Columbia University, Sherri-Ann Butterfield, Rutgers University-Newark, Toby Gordon, Johns Hopkins University, and Arvind Rajagopal, New York University.

This is the second panel of the two-day conference (April 8-9, 2016) on the popular television series The Wire, hosted by the Heyman Center for the Humanities at Columbia University. This panel is titled "Seriality and Narrative Experience" and featured Frank Kelleter, Freie Universität, Berlin, Rob King, Columbia University, Jason Mittell, Middlebury College, and Linda Williams, University of California, Berkeley. The panel was organized by Jane Gaines and Rob King, Film Division, School of the Arts, Columbia University. 

This is the fifth panel of the two-day conference (April 8-9, 2016) on the popular television series The Wire, hosted by the Heyman Center for the Humanities at Columbia University. This panel is titled "Music from The Wire" and featured performances by Diablo Flamez and DJ Technics. Panelists included Sheri Parks, University of Maryland, Michael Casiano, University of Maryland, Ashley Minner, University of Maryland,  Kalima Young, University of Maryland, and Ashley Minner, University of Maryland. The panel was organized by Sheri Parks, University of Maryland.  

This is the seventh panel of the two-day conference (April 8-9, 2016) on the popular television series The Wire, hosted by the Heyman Center for the Humanities at Columbia University. This panel is titled "Mass Incarceration and the School-to-Prison Pipeline" and featured Mariame Kaba, Project Nia, Desmond U. Patton, Columbia University, Carla Shedd, Columbia University and New York City High School Student Representatives. The panel was organized by Carla Shedd and the Center for Justice.

This is the seventh panel of the two-day conference (April 8-9, 2016) on the popular television series The Wire, hosted by the Heyman Center for the Humanities at Columbia University. This panel is titled "Religion, Race, Politics in the Inner City." Panelists include Monica R. Miller, Lehigh University, Michael Leo Owens, Emory University, Josef Sorett, Columbia University, Rev. LaKeesha Walrond, First Corinthian Baptist Church, New York City, and Joseph R. Winters II, Duke University. The panel was organized by Josef Sorett, Institute for Research on African American Studies.

On April 1, 2016, the Heyman Center for the Humanities hosted the conference "1916: The Irish Rising" where scholars from Ireland and New York discussed the 1916 Easter Rising on its centennial. This video is of the afternoon segment, "1916 in Perspective, a Roundtable," featuring: Emily Bloom, Columbia University, Therese Cox, Columbia University, Sarah Cole, Columbia University, Gregory Londe, Cornell University, Janet Lyon, Pennsylvania State University, and Paul K. Saint-Amour, University of Pennsylvania. 

Robert Alter presented the next installment of the Lionel Trilling Seminar on March 7, 2016.  Herbert Marks and Michael Wood served as respondents. The David story and Stendhal's Charterhouse of Parma, the first narrative very early and the other relatively late in the Western literary tradition, are deeply instructive instances of how the vehicle of fiction can provide insights into the realm of politics. Each in its own way shows the role individual character plays in the gaining and maintaining of power and how the exercise of power affects or distorts character.  The biblical story is compellingly grave, Stendhal's novel satiric and sometimes comic, but both manifest an unblinking vision of man as a political animal.