Video / Audio  Heyman Center

Colm Tóibín is the author of many bestselling and critically acclaimed novels, including The Master (which was shortlisted for the Man Booker Prize) and Brooklyn; the short-story collection Mothers and Sons; and, most recently, both the novel and play The Testament of Mary (which will open on Broadway later this spring, starring Fiona Shaw). Julie Orringer is the author of the short-story collection How to Breathe Underwater, which won the Northern California Book Award and was named a New York Times Notable Book of the Year and a “Best Book” by the Los Angeles Times and the San Francisco Chronicle. In 2011, she published her “expertly crafted” and “emotionally haunting” first novel, The Invisible Bridge. Together, they will discuss the topic of “Family Novels" with Deborah Cohen, Professor of History at Northwestern and author of the forthcoming historical study Family Secrets.

Through a re-consideration of several classic instances, this lecture explores some of the ways in which the very excesses of polemical or satirical contributions to public debate may themselves be the main bearer of more adequate conceptions of human life.  It asks the unsettling question: might the outrageous offensiveness of F.R. Leavis's notorious attack on C.P. Snow actually provide a better model than contributions that are normally regarded as more 'constructive' and 'helpful'?

A discussion on "Keywords: Toward a Critical Vocabulary of Disability Studies."

Uzodinma Iweala, MD, is the author of the multi-award-winning novel Beasts of No Nation (prizes from the Los Angeles Times, the New York Public Library, the American Academy of Arts and Letters, and Booktrust) and of the non-fiction Our Kind of People: Thoughts on HIV/AIDS in Nigeria (2012). In 2007 he was selected as one of Granta's Best Young American Novelists. Dr. Iweala will read from his latest work, Speak No Evil –which he describes as a “a series of interlinked narratives set in Washington, DC that explores the themes of choice, freedom, and what we must compromise to live in a secure society.”

Uzodinma Iweala, MD, is the author of the multi-award-winning novel Beasts of No Nation (prizes from the Los Angeles Times, the New York Public Library, the American Academy of Arts and Letters, and Booktrust) and of the non-fiction Our Kind of People: Thoughts on HIV/AIDS in Nigeria (2012).  In 2007, he was selected as one of Granta's Best Young American Novelists.  Dr. Iweala reads from his latest work, Speak No Evil –which he describes as a “a series of interlinked narratives set in Washington, DC that explores the themes of choice, freedom, and what we must compromise to live in a secure society.”

The relatively new field of inequality studies is gaining increasing momentum as economic disparity grows throughout the world, in advanced countries as well as less developed ones—especially in the United States.  Speakers Joseph E. Stiglitz, professor of economics at Columbia University and the recipient of a John Bates Clark Medal and a Nobel Prize, James K. Galbraith, Professor of Government at the Lyndon B. Johnson School of Public Affairs, University of Texas, and Branko Milanovic, Lead Economist in the World Bank's Research Department, will address the progressive emergence of this new discipline.

David Henry Hwang, Tony award-winning playwright of such plays as M. Butterfly, Yellow Face, Golden Child, and Chinglish, visited Columbia to discuss his work, including Kung Fu (inspired by the life of Bruce Lee), which will premiere this spring at the Signature Theatre Company. Joining him in conversation was theater director and Columbia professor Gregory Mosher, former head of both the Lincoln Center and Goodman Theatres, and Jean Howard, George Delacorte Professor in the Humanities at Columbia and a prominent theater scholar.

A discussion on "Tracking Women Across Four Decades: Reflections."