James Tully

Distinguished Professor of Political Science, Law, Indigenous Governance and Philosophy

University of Victoria, Canada

James Hamilton Tully is the Distinguished Professor of Political Science, Law, Indigenous Governance and Philosophy at the University of Victoria. After completing his BA at UBC and PhD at the University of Cambridge he taught in the departments of Philosophy and Political Science at McGill University 1977-1996. He was Professor and Chair of the Department of Political Science at the University of Victoria 1996-2001. In 2001-2003 he was the inaugural Henry N.R. Jackman Distinguished Professor in Philosophical Studies at the University of Toronto in the departments of Philosophy and Political Science and the Faculty of Law. In 2003 he returned to the University of Victoria. He is Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada and Emeritus Fellow of the Trudeau Foundation. In 2010 he was awarded the Killam Prize in the Humanities for his outstanding contribution to scholarship and Canadian public life. His two-volume work, Public Philosophy in a New Key (Cambridge University Press 2008), was awarded the C.B. Macpherson Prize by the Canadian Political Science Association for the best book in political theory written in English or French in Canada 2008-2010. He is consulting editor of the journals Political Theory and Global Constitutionalism, co-editor of the Clarendon Works of John Locke and former co-editor of the Cambridge Ideas in Context Series. He has published 11 authored & edited volumes and 90 chapters and articles on political theory, the history of political thought, Canadian political and legal theory and Indigenous politics.

Among his recent public lectures are: the Oxford Amnesty Lecture on Two Traditions of Human Rights (2010), the Keynote Lecture on Citizenship for the Love of the World, Challenging Citizenship Conference, Coimbra, Portugal (2011), Stanley Woodward Lecture Yale University on Franz Boas (2011), James Moffett Lecture Princeton University on Global Citizenship (2011), and the MacKay Lecture Dalhousie University on a renewed relationship between Indigenous and non-Indigenous peoples in 2012.