Paula Findlen

Ubaldo Pierotti Professor of Italian History

Stanford University

Paula Findlen teaches the early history of science and medicine on the premise that one of the most important ways to understand how science, medicine and technology have become so central to contemporary society comes from examining the process by which scientific knowledge emerged. She takes enormous pleasure in examining a kind of scientific knowledge that did not have an autonomous existence from other kinds of creative endeavors, but emerged in the context of humanistic approaches to the world (in defiance of C.P. Snow's claim that the modern world is one of "two cultures" that share very little in common). Profesor Findlen is profoundly attracted to individuals in the past who aspired to know everything. It still seems like a worthy goal.

Findlen's other principal interest lies in understanding the world of the Renaissance, with a particular focus on Italy. She continues to be fascinated by a society that made politics, economics, and culture so important to its self-definition, and that obviously succeeded in all these endeavors for some time, as the legacy of such figures as Machiavelli and Leonardo suggests. Renaissance Italy, in short, is a historical laboratory for understanding the possibilities and the problems of an innovative society. As such, it provides an interesting point of comparison to Gilded Age America, where magnates such as J.P. Morgan often described themselves as the "new Medici," and to other historical moments when politics, art and society combined fruitfully.