Fall 2017

Maria Abascal

Assistant Professor of Sociology
Columbia University

I'm an Assistant Professor of Sociology at Columbia University. I recently completed a postdoc in the Population Studies and Training Center at Brown University. I received my PhD in Sociology and Social Policy from Princeton University. Broadly, I am interested in intergroup relations and boundary processes, especially as they pertain to race, ethnicity and nationalism. My dissertation explores the impact of Hispanic population growth––real and perceived––on relations between Blacks and Whites in the United States. My research draws on a range of quantitative methods and data sources, including original lab, survey, and field experiments. Other research projects deal with the consequences of diversity, the determinants of skin color perception, the sources of the criminal immigrant stereotype, the predictors of immigrant naturalization, and the geographic distribution of patriotic behaviors. 

Joelle M. Abi-Rached

Lecturer in Middle Eastern, South Asian, and African Studies (MESAAS)
Columbia University

Joelle M. Abi-Rached received her Ph.D. in History of Science from Harvard University. She holds a Medical Doctorate from the American University of Beirut and a Master’s in Philosophy and Public Policy from the London School of Economics. Her first book co-authored with Nikolas Rose, entitled Neuro: The New Brain Sciences and the Management of the Mind (Princeton University Press, 2013) explored the genealogy of the neurosciences and their growing salience in the governance and everyday life of neoliberal democracies. 

Lila Abu-Lughod

Joseph L. Buttenwieser Professor of Social Science
Columbia University

Lila Abu-Lughod is Director of the Center for the Study of Social Difference. She is the Joseph L. Buttenwieser Professor of Social Science at Columbia University, and Professor of Anthropology and Women’s and Gender Studies. Her courses focus on gender politics and nationalism in the Muslim world and on liberalism, culture, and the politics of human and women’s rights. A leading voice in debates about gender, Islam, and global policy, her books and publications have been translated into more than 13 languages.

Rachel Adams

Professor of English and Comparative Literature
Columbia University

Rachel Adams is a writer and Professor of English and American Studies at Columbia University. She is the author of numerous academic articles and book reviews, as well as three books: Raising Henry: A Memoir of Motherhood, Disability, and Discovery (Yale University Press, 2013), which won the Delta Kappa Gamma Educators' Award; Sideshow U.S.A.: Freaks and the American Cultural Imagination and Continental Divides: Remapping the Cultures of North America (both published by the University of Chicago Press). She is co-editor (with Benjamin Reiss and David Serlin) of Keywords for Disability Studies (NYU Press, 2015), (with David Savran) of The Masculinity Studies Reader (Blackwell, 2002) and editor of Kate Chopin's The Awakening (Fine Publications, 2002). Her public writing has also appeared in such places as the New York Times, Washington Post, Salon, Chronicle of Higher Education and the Times of London. In 2012 she won a Lenfest Distinguished Columbia Faculty award.

Faiz Ahmed

Assistant Professor of History
Brown University

Trained as a lawyer and social historian, Faiz Ahmed specializes in the legal and constitutional history of the Middle East and Islamicate world. From the Ottoman Empire to the British Raj, and the eastern Mediterranean to the Indian Ocean, Ahmed's primary research interests include student and scholarly networks, constitutional movements and state building, and international law and diplomacy. His first book, Afghanistan Rising: Islamic Law and Statecraft between the Ottoman and British Empires (Harvard University Press, 2017), unearths a lost history of Muslim debates and exchange across regional divides by tracing the struggle of a diverse cast of jurists in winning Afghan independence and promulgating the country's first constitution between 1877 and 1923. 

Nora Akawi

Adjunct Assistant Professor and Director of Studio-X Amman, GSAPP
Columbia University

Nora is an architect based between Amman and New York. As Director of Columbia GSAPP's Studio-X Amman, she leads the conceptualization and implementation of public programs and research initiatives on architecture in the Arab region by curating (often in partnership with other researchers or institutions) conferences, workshops, publications, screenings, lectures, and other forms of collective cultural production.

Zeynep Çelik Alexander

Assistant Professor, Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape, and Design
University of Toronto

Zeynep Çelik Alexander is Assistant Professor at the Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape, and Design at the University of Toronto. She is an architectural historian whose work focuses on the history and theory of modern architecture since the Enlightenment. 

Tariq Ali

Writer/Filmmaker

Tariq Ali is a writer and filmmaker. He has written more than two dozen books on world history and politics, and seven novels (translated into over a dozen languages) as well as scripts for the stage and screen. He is an editor of New Left Review and lives in London.