Visiting Speakers

Bernard E.  Harcourt

Isidor and Seville Sulzbacher Professor of Law and Director, Columbia Center for Contemporary Critical Thought,
Columbia University

Bernard E. Harcourt joined the Columbia Law School faculty in July 2014. His scholarship intersects social and political theory, the sociology of punishment, and penal law and procedure.

Jennifer Hayashida

Asian American Studies Program Director
Hunter College

Poet, translator and visual artist Jennifer Hayashida was born in Oakland, CA, and grew up in the suburbs of Stockholm and San Francisco. She received her B.A. in American Studies from the University of California at Berkeley, and completed her M.F.A. in poetry from the Milton Avery Graduate School of the Arts at Bard College.

N. Katherine Hayles

James B. Duke Professor of Literature
Duke University

N. Katherine Hayles is the James B. Duke Professor of Literature at Duke University. She teaches and writes on the relations of literature, science and technology in the 20th and 21st centuries. Her books include How We Became Posthuman: Virtual Bodies in Cybernetics, Literature and Informatics, which won the Rene Wellek Award for the Best Book in Literary Theory, 1998-99, and Writing Machines, which won the Suzanne Langer Award for Outstanding Scholarship.

Sonja Hegasy

Vice Director
Zentrum Moderner Orient, Berlin

Dr. Sonja Hegasy is Vice Director, previously a Senior Researcher, at Zentrum Moderner Orient in Berlin. She received her Ph.D. from the Free University of Berlin in 1996; her fields of itnerest include transition and democratic reform in the Middle East and North Africa, political sociology, civil society, intercultural dialogue, reconciliation and politics of memory, world society, cultural globalization and the Arab world, youth studies. Since 2012 she heads the research project ‘Transforming Memories: Cultural Production and Personal/Public Memory in Lebanon and Morocco’ at ZMO.

Peter Hitchcock

Professor of English
Baruch College; CUNY

Peter Hitchcock is Professor of English at Baruch College and the Graduate Center of the City University of New York. He is also on the faculties of Women’s Studies and Film Studies at the GC. He is the author of five books, including The Long Space, for Stanford University Press. His most recent publications include, “Accumulating Fictions” for Representations,“Immolation” for the Routledge Companion to Literature and Human Rights, “How to Read a Discipline” for Comparative Literature, “Culture and Anarchy in Thatcher’s London” for an anthology on Hanif Kureishi, “( ) of Ghosts” in The Spectralities Reader, “The Space of Time: Chronotopes and Crisis” for Primerjalna Knjizevnost, “Defining the World” inLiterary Materialisms and “Everything’s Gone Green: The Environment of BP’s Narrative” for Imaginations. Forthcoming articles include an essay, “Viscosity and Velocity,” for an anthology on oil (Cornell), and an essay on communism titled “The Leninist Hypothesis” for Poetics Today. Forthcoming book projects include a monograph on the cultural representation of labor, a monograph on worlds of postcoloniality, and an edited collection on the New Public Intellectual. He is currently working on two research projects: one about seriality in politics and culture; the other on the aesthetics of commodities and financial instruments.

Neville Hoad

Associate Professor of English
The University of Texas at Austin

Neville Hoad is an associate professor of English and affiliated faculty with the Center for Women's and Gender Studies, the Center for African and African American Studies, and the Bernard and Audre Rapoport Center for Human Rights and Justice. He authored African Intimacies: Race, Homosexuality and Globalization(Minnesota, 2007) and co-edits (with Karen Martin and Graeme Reid) Sex & Politics in South Africa (Double Storey, 2005). He is writing a book on the literary and cultural representations of the HIV/AIDS pandemic in Sub-Saharan Africa. Areas of research include African and Victorian literature, queer theory, and the history of sexuality.

Neville Hoad

Associate Professor of English
The University of Texas at Austin

Neville Hoad is an associate professor of English and affiliated faculty with the Center for Women's and Gender Studies, the Center for African and African American Studies, and the Bernard and Audre Rapoport Center for Human Rights and Justice. He authored African Intimacies: Race, Homosexuality and Globalization(Minnesota, 2007) and co-edits (with Karen Martin and Graeme Reid) Sex & Politics in South Africa (Double Storey, 2005). He is writing a book on the literary and cultural representations of the HIV/AIDS pandemic in Sub-Saharan Africa. Areas of research include African and Victorian literature, queer theory, and the history of sexuality.

Stephen Hopkins

Lecturer
University of Leicester

Stephen Hopkins is Lecturer in the Department of Politics and International Relations at the University of Leicester. He received his BA from Oxford University and currently teaches courses in "The Politics of War and Peace: Northern Ireland after 1972," and "The Political Legacies of Conflict in Northern Ireland." His book  The Politics of Memoir and the Northern Ireland Conflict was published in 2013 through Liverpool University Press. Recent journal articles include ‘“It’s the Art of Always Falling on your Feet!” Exile, Communism and Memories of the Spanish Civil War in the Writing of Jorge Semprún’ in Anindya Raychaudhuri (ed.), The Spanish Civil War: Exhuming a Buried Past (University of Chicago Press, 2013), and Review Essay: Stalinism and the Soviet Politics of the Self’, Socialist History, No.36 (May 2010), pp.107-115.