Fellows

Arden Hegele

Lecturer in English
Columbia University

Arden Hegele received her PhD from Columbia University in 2016. She specializes in nineteenth-century British literature. Her book project, Reading Autopsy: The Medical Practice of Romantic Literature, argues that Romantic poetry and prose borrow formal methods from medical science, especially pathology and psychiatry. In addition to the medical humanities, her interests include the gendered body, literary interchange between British colonies, environmental science and technology, Irish literature, and rare books and manuscripts. She is the author of “Romantic Autopsy and Wordsworth’s Two-Part Prelude,” which won the 2014 North American Society for the Study of Romanticism Prize for Best Graduate Student Paper and was subsequently published in European Romantic Review, as well as articles published in Gender and Education, The Byron Journal, and Persuasions, and her book reviews are published or forthcoming in Public Books, Review 19, Studies in Romanticism, Victorian Network and Partial Answers.

Max Mishler

Lecturer in the Center for the Study of Ethnicity and Race
Columbia University

Max Mishler received his PhD in History from New York University in 2016. His current book project, The Atlantic Origins of Mass Incarceration: Punishment, Abolition, and Racial Inequality,explores the intertwined history of slave-emancipation and the birth of the modern penitentiary in the Atlantic world. This research has been recognized and supported by the Social Science Research Council, the Council on Library Information Resources, the Institute for Historical Research, and the McNeil Center for Early American Studies at the University of Pennsylvania. Max’s work has appeared in Social Text and New Labor Forum. Prior to graduate school, Max was as an educator at a juvenile correctional facility and spent nearly a decade working as a union organizer with the Service Employees Union, Local 32BJ.

Natacha Nsabimana

2016 - 2017 Public Humanities Fellow
Columbia University

Public Humanities Fellow | Natacha Nsabimana is currently pursuing a Ph.D. in anthropology at Columbia University. Her dissertation is concerned with the everyday aftermath of violence in post-genocide Rwanda. It examines the ways in which the violence of the genocide against Tutsi occupies the spatial memory of Rwanda's landscape and the kinds of individual and national narratives such memory allows and disavows. Her project will engage young women at the Rose M Singer Center for Women on Rikers Island to produce a literary journal discussing social justice issues such as racism, slavery, incarceration and sexual violence through the prism of art. This project expands on existing programs developed by the Justice in Education Initiative at Columbia University, a collaboration between the Center for Justice and the Heyman Center for the Humanities.

Sahar Ullah

2016 - 2017 Public Humanities Fellow
Columbia University

Public Humanities Fellow | Sahar Ishtiaque Ullah is a Ph.D. candidate in Arabic and Comparative Literature at Columbia University where she teaches and is completing her dissertation on the role of the erotic prelude in medieval Arabic-Islamic poetics. Her research interests also include the classical in contemporary Arabic literature and representations of Muslims in late medieval and early modern European literature. As a Public Humanities Fellow, Sahar will curate an interactive public arts project that includes the works of Muslim storytellers, poets, and visual artists with a special attention to North American minorities and immigrants with roots from regions largely portrayed as conflict zones in U.S. media outlets.