Spring 2018

Joelle M. Abi-Rached

Lecturer in Middle Eastern, South Asian, and African Studies (MESAAS)
Columbia University

Joelle M. Abi-Rached received her Ph.D. in History of Science from Harvard University. She holds a Medical Doctorate from the American University of Beirut and a Master’s in Philosophy and Public Policy from the London School of Economics. Her first book co-authored with Nikolas Rose, entitled Neuro: The New Brain Sciences and the Management of the Mind (Princeton University Press, 2013) explored the genealogy of the neurosciences and their growing salience in the governance and everyday life of neoliberal democracies. 

Rachel Adams

Professor of English and Comparative Literature
Columbia University

Rachel Adams is a writer and Professor of English and American Studies at Columbia University. She is the author of numerous academic articles and book reviews, as well as three books: Raising Henry: A Memoir of Motherhood, Disability, and Discovery (Yale University Press, 2013), which won the Delta Kappa Gamma Educators' Award; Sideshow U.S.A.: Freaks and the American Cultural Imagination and Continental Divides: Remapping the Cultures of North America (both published by the University of Chicago Press). She is co-editor (with Benjamin Reiss and David Serlin) of Keywords for Disability Studies (NYU Press, 2015), (with David Savran) of The Masculinity Studies Reader (Blackwell, 2002) and editor of Kate Chopin's The Awakening (Fine Publications, 2002). Her public writing has also appeared in such places as the New York Times, Washington Post, Salon, Chronicle of Higher Education and the Times of London. In 2012 she won a Lenfest Distinguished Columbia Faculty award.

JM Chris Chang

Doctoral Candidate in the Department of History
Columbia University

JM Chris Chang is a student in modern Chinese history working on the relationship between petition writing and ideological revisionism in the post-Mao transition. He received his BA from Amherst College and a dual-MA from Columbia and the London School of Economics. Prior to returning to Columbia to begin the PhD track, he was a visiting researcher at Beijing University

Anna Danziger Halperin

Doctoral Candidate in the Department of History
Columbia University

Anna K. Danziger Halperin is a doctoral candidate in the Department of History at Columbia University. She focuses on comparative social policy, gender, and childhood. Anna graduated from Barnard College in 2006 with a degree in History and Human Rights. Before returning to Columbia, she conducted research on U.S. child care policies and other related issues affecting low-wage working families during her employment with the Urban Institute and the Institute for Women's Policy Research. Her dissertation comparatively analyzes child care policy in Britain and the United States, interrogating conceptions of motherhood, child-rearing, and state interventions in the private realm

Tess Drahman

Communications & Web Coordinator

Tess has been working in higher education for over eight years. She began at Columbia University in 2013 as Program Coordinator of the Institute for Research on Women, Gender, and Sexuality (IRWGS), and was most recently the Program Manager at the European Institute. Prior to joining the staff at Columbia, Tess worked at The Juilliard School in the Alan D. Marks Center for Career Services and Entrepreneurship. Tess holds an M.A. in Media Management from The New School, and a B.A. in Art History and Film Studies from Sweet Briar College.

Robert Gooding-Williams

M. Moran Weston/Black Alumni Council Professor of African-American Studies,
Professor of Philosophy
Columbia University

Robert Gooding-Williams holds appointments in both the Philosophy Department and the Institute for Research in African American Studies (IRAAS), where he is a member of the Core Faculty and founding director of the Center for Race, Philosophy, and Social Justice.

Rob Goodman

Doctoral Candidate in the Department of Political Science
Columbia University

Rob Goodman is a Ph.D. candidate in the department of Political Science at Columbia University and an instructor in the Core Curriculum. His dissertation focuses on rhetoric and eloquence in the history of political thought. Before beginning graduate study at Columbia, Rob worked as speechwriter for House Majority Leader Steny Hoyer and Sen. Chris Dodd. He studied at Duke University (B.A., English, 2005) and George Washington University (M.A., Public Policy, 2011). Rob is the co-author of two books: A Mind at Play, a biography of Claude Shannon (Simon & Schuster, September 2017), and Rome's Last Citizen, a book on Cato the Younger and the Roman Republic (Thomas Dunne, 2012). His academic work has appeared in History of Political Thought (2016), The Journal of Medicine and Philosophy (2014), and the Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal (2010). He has also written for publications including Slate, The Atlantic, Politico, and The Chronicle of Higher Education.  

Matthew Hart

Associate Professor of English & Comparative Literature
Columbia University

Matt Hart specializes in twentieth and twenty-first century literature, with an emphasis on modernism, poetry, and contemporary British fiction. He is also interested in connections between literature and the visual arts and between literary history and political history. Recent classes have focused on the question of Late Modernism, on Contemporary Black British Literature, and on rethinking the nation-state/transnationalism relation in contemporary writing and critical theory.