Visiting Speakers

Macarena Gomez-Barris

Chairperson of Social Science & Cultural Studies
Social Science & Cultural Studies
The Pratt Institute

Macarena Gómez-Barris is the Pratt Institute Chair of Department of Social Sciences and Cultural Studies. She is author of Where Memory Dwells: Culture and State Violence in Chile (Berkeley: University of California Press, 2009) and Towards a Sociology of a Trace, co-edited with Herman Gray (University of Minnesota Press, 2010). Her forthcoming book is The Extractive Zone: Submerged Perspectives and Decoloniality (Duke University Press), which analyzes five regions within South America. In this book, Macarena attends to how social and ecological life resists the practices of extractive capitalism through social and visual activisms, especially upon indigenous territories. Macarena received a Fulbright Research Fellowship in 2014-2015, and was visiting professor at FLACSO-Ecuador in the Department of Sociology and Gender Studies. Most recently, she was an Associate Professor at the Department of American Studies & Ethnicity at the University of Southern California. Macarena researches and teaches on culture, memory, violence, race, social theory and decolonization in the Américas. She will bring all of these experiences to Pratt Institute where she will launch a multidisciplinary research initiative based in the Department of Social Sciences and Cultural Studies.

Toni Negri

Philosopher

Antonio "Toni" Negri is an Italian Marxist sociologist and political philosopher, best known for his co-authorship of Empire, and secondarily for his work on Spinoza.

Sanford Biggers

Associate Professor of Visual Arts
Columbia University School of the Arts

Sanford Biggers (b. 1970) has received international acclaim for creating a diverse body of work in a variety of media revolving around themes of identity, spirituality, and race. In his series of six prints entitled The Floating World, Sanford explores imagery from American history that can also be found in his series of Quilt Drawings. Quilts were commonly used on the Underground Railroad to convey messages to slaves regarding safe houses and information pertinent to their travels. Through paper collage, Sanford recreates the feel of a handmade quilt and uses stencils, silkscreen, and spray-paint as a vehicle for his visual vocabulary. The Floating Worldmakes a vibrant connection between history and its influence on the present.

Julian Brave Noisecat is a writer, wonk and activist.  

Gabriella Coleman

Wolfe Chair in Scientific and Technological Literacy
McGill University

Gabriella (Biella) Coleman holds the Wolfe Chair in Scientific and Technological Literacy at McGill University. Trained as a cultural anthropologist, she researches, writes, and teaches on computer hackers and digital activism. Her first book on Free Software, Coding Freedom: The Ethics and Aesthetics of Hacking has been published with Princeton University Press. Her new book, Hacker, Hoaxer, Whistleblower, Spy: The Many Faces of Anonymous, published by Verso, has been named to Kirkus Reviews’ Best Books of 2014.

Ivonne del Valle

Associate Professor in the Department of Spanish and Portugese
University of California, Berkeley

Ivonne del Valle is Associate Professor of Colonial Studies. She received her Ph.D. from U.C. Berkeley in 2004, and before returning to the Bay Area in 2009, she taught at the University of Michigan. Her research and teaching make connections between the past and the present which try to show the relevance of the colonial period for an understanding of contemporary times. She was co-director of the Berkeley research group “Mexico and the Rule of Law.” She has written a book and a series of articles on the Jesuits (José de Acosta and Loyola, and Jesuits in the northern borderlands of New Spain) as a particularly influential politico-religious order that served modernization and the expansion of the Spanish empire.

Malcolm  Gladwell is an English-born Canadian journalist, author, and speaker. He has been a staff writer for The New Yorker since 1996. He has written five books: The Tipping Point: How Little Things Can Make a Big Difference (2000), Blink: The Power of Thinking Without Thinking (2005), Outliers: The Story of Success (2008), What the Dog Saw: And Other Adventures (2009), a collection of his journalism, and David and Goliath: Underdogs, Misfits, and the Art of Battling Giants (2013). All five books were on The New York Times Best Seller list. He is also the host of the podcast Revisionist History.

Eric Corley

Publisher
2600: The Hacker Quarterly

Corley is the editor of The Best of 2600: A Hacker Odyssey which was released July 2008. The book consists of articles from the magazine 2600: The Hacker Quarterly set in chronological order to show the evolution of the internet and technology. A follow-up book, Dear Hacker. Letters to the Editor of 2600, was published in 2010.