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Sahar Ishtiaque Ullah is a Ph.D. candidate in Arabic and Comparative Literature at Columbia University where she teaches and is completing her dissertation on the role of the erotic prelude in medieval Arabic-Islamic poetics. Her research interests also include the classical in contemporary Arabic literature and representations of Muslims in late medieval and early modern European literature. As a Public Humanities Fellow, Sahar will curate an interactive public arts project that includes the works of Muslim storytellers, poets, and visual artists with a special attention to North American minorities and immigrants with roots from regions largely portrayed as conflict zones in U.S. media outlets. 

Natacha Nsabimana is currently pursuing a Ph.D. in anthropology at Columbia University. Her dissertation is concerned with the everyday aftermath of violence in post-genocide Rwanda. It examines the ways in which the violence of the genocide against Tutsi occupies the spatial memory of Rwanda's landscape and the kinds of individual and national narratives such memory allows and disavows. Her project will engage young women at the Rose M Singer Center for Women on Rikers Island to produce a literary journal discussing social justice issues such as racism, slavery, incarceration and sexual violence through the prism of art. This project expands on existing programs developed by the Justice in Education Initiative at Columbia University, a collaboration between the Center for Justice and the Heyman Center for the Humanities.

Mortality Mansions

May 11, 2017

A collaboration of 2006 U.S. Poet Laureate Donald Hall and Grammy® Award-winning composer Herschel Garfein, Mortality Mansions reflects on the themes of love, sexuality and bereavement in old age from Hall’s poems and traces the adoption of Hall’s work into the curricula of medical schools across the country. The world premiere performance features tenor Michael Slattery and Dmitri Dover, acclaimed pianist for the Metropolitan opera Lindemann Young Artist program, joined by Pulitzer Prize-winning novelist Richard Ford, National Book Award-winning poet Jean Valentine and Dr. Rita Charon, professor of Clinical Medicine and director of the Program in Narrative Medicine at Columbia University, who will read Hall’s poems. Hall will participate via remote video link from his farmhouse in New Hampshire.

Friday, February 8, 2013 - Saturday, February 9, 2013

Pink Mist tells the story of three young Bristol men deployed to Afghanistan. Returning to the women in their lives who must now share the physical and psychological aftershocks of their service, Arthur, Hads and Taff find their journey home is their greatest battle. This play was inspired by 30 interviews with returned servicemen and first staged at Bristol Old Vic in 2015. Described as fearlessly lyrical in its imagery” (The Times) and “the most important play of the year" (What’s On Stage), Pink Mist will be published in the US for the first time on April 4 by Nan A. Talese/Doubleday. Owen Sheers will read from his work, followed by a panel discussion with Peter Meineck and Maurice Decaul.

The Irish and the Jews Tuesday, April 4, 2017   Pól Ó Dochartaigh, "Representations of Jews in Irish Literature" and Ruth Gilligan, reading from Nine Folds Make a Paper Swan.

New Books in the Arts & Sciences          —panel discussions celebrating recent work by the Columbia Faculty The Ink of the Scholars: Reflections on Philosophy in Africa by Souleymane Bachir Diagne

Liane Carlson received her PhD in philosophy of religion at Columbia University in 2015, where she received her M.A. (2010) and M.Phil (2012) after graduating summa cum laude from Washington and Lee University (2007). Her research interests include the philosophical and theological history of Critical Theory, with particular emphasis on German Romanticism, the limits of the critical power of history, the problem of evil, and the intersection of religion and literature.