Video

The Keynote discussion between Jonathan Weiner and Judith Shulevitz.

A conversation on "Health and Truth in Social Justice Stories."

Marie Myung-Ok Lee reads from her work that examines the future of medicine and tells the micro-history of two generations of Korean American OBGyns.

Taking “medical humanities” as its subject, the two-day conference considers some of the investigations and interventions made by those who study illness and health from the perspectives of the arts, humanities, and human sciences.  Presentations by medical practitioners, historians, social justice advocates, medical journalists, disability studies and narrative studies scholars will be interspersed with readings by poets and novelists, reports from the field, and a theatrical performance. This panel discussed "Medicine, Humanities, and the Human Sciences: A Historical Perspective."

Uzodinma Iweala, MD, is the author of the multi-award-winning novel Beasts of No Nation (prizes from the Los Angeles Times, the New York Public Library, the American Academy of Arts and Letters, and Booktrust) and of the non-fiction Our Kind of People: Thoughts on HIV/AIDS in Nigeria (2012). In 2007 he was selected as one of Granta's Best Young American Novelists. Dr. Iweala will read from his latest work, Speak No Evil –which he describes as a “a series of interlinked narratives set in Washington, DC that explores the themes of choice, freedom, and what we must compromise to live in a secure society.”

Uzodinma Iweala, MD, is the author of the multi-award-winning novel Beasts of No Nation (prizes from the Los Angeles Times, the New York Public Library, the American Academy of Arts and Letters, and Booktrust) and of the non-fiction Our Kind of People: Thoughts on HIV/AIDS in Nigeria (2012).  In 2007, he was selected as one of Granta's Best Young American Novelists.  Dr. Iweala reads from his latest work, Speak No Evil –which he describes as a “a series of interlinked narratives set in Washington, DC that explores the themes of choice, freedom, and what we must compromise to live in a secure society.”

Hilton Als and Lisa Cohen read from recent and forthcoming projects and later conversed with moderator Heather Love.

The recent financial crisis has raised disturbing questions about our nation’s business elite.   To what extent can this crisis be traced to the pedagogy of our business schools?   Can business education promote the public good?  If not, then how might we go about re-envisioning the education of the next generation of business leaders?  This event featured Rakesh Khurana, Nicholas Lemann, Martin Dickson, and Richard R. John