Video

Radical Grace by Alain Badiou

December 14, 2015

December 14, 2015 "Radical Grace" by Alain Badiou on the role of art in response to present tragic circumstances. Introduction by Udi Aloni. Moderated by James Schamus.

December 8, 2015 a lecture on Identity and Universality by Alain Badiou in light of contemporary tragic events in Paris and elsewhere. December 8, 2015: Many forms of violence in the contemporary world are concerned with either the violent confrontation of different collective identities, or the exasperated resistance of certain of these identities against that which is presented as having a universal value. The central question in these cases is this: what is the historical and conceptual relationship between the feeling of belonging to an identity and the construction of a universal value? Alain Badiou teaches philosophy at the École Normale Supérieure and the Collège International de Philosophie in Paris, and was a founder of the faculty of Philosophy of the Université de Paris VIII. A politically engaged philosopher, his major philosophical works include Theory of the Subject, Being and Event, Manifesto for Philosophy, and Gilles Deleuze. He has also written several novels, plays and political essays. Co-sponsored by the Heyman Center for the Humanities, Maison Francaise, Center for Contemporary Critical Thought, and Film and Media Studies.

The Confined Arts

December 4, 2015

The launch of the third edition of The Confined Arts (TCA) series took place on December 4-6, 2015.  The 40-day art exhibition launched at an opening weekend consisting of art, poetry, motivational speaking, panel discussions, a promotional screening, hands-on workshops, and more.

How do we teach the history of imprisonment in the United States when mass incarceration continues to shape our current social landscape? Heyman Center Public Humanities Fellow Emily Hainze will speak about a curriculum project she is developing in partnership with the Prison Public Memory Project, a non-profit dedicated to recovering, preserving and interpreting the historical artifacts and cultural memory of prisons, and the communities with which they are entwined.

Since the 1940s, invocations of "close reading" (however understood) have figured centrally in controversies over new methodological developments in literary studies: e.g., the New Criticism, structuralism, New Historicism, deconstruction, ideology critique, and, notably now, the Digital Humanities. The talk recalls some of those controversies and considers how the idea or ideal of "close reading" operates in current debates about-- and within-- the Digital Humanities.

Participants in "Description Across the Disciplines" will consider the relation between description and other modes of engaging with objects of analysis, such as interpretation, evaluation, argument, and critique.

Participants in "Description Across the Disciplines" will consider the relation between description and other modes of engaging with objects of analysis, such as interpretation, evaluation, argument, and critique.

Participants in "Description Across the Disciplines" will consider the relation between description and other modes of engaging with objects of analysis, such as interpretation, evaluation, argument, and critique.