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Emily Hainze is a doctoral candidate in English and Comparative Literature at Columbia University, where she writes and teaches about 19th- and 20th-century American literature. Her dissertation focuses on women’s incarceration in the United States, exploring how questions of narrative and genre have been shaped by the conceptualization of women’s crime from the late 19th century onward. As a Public Humanities Fellow at the Heyman Center, Emily will work to develop an online repository for digitized archival records of women and imprisonment, with an eye towards classroom use.

Mary Grace Albanese is a doctoral candidate in English and Comparative Literature at Columbia University. Her dissertation centers on the role of the Haitian Revolution in early 19th-century French-U.S. literary exchange. Her other research interests include translation theory, the transatlantic Gothic, and the legal history of slavery. She is also a translator between French and English, with multiple areas of specialization including law, medicine, and education. As a Public Humanities Fellow, Mary Grace will create a forum for the collection, translation, and publication of Haitian history as told by Haitians themselves. Through a trans-lingual oral history initiative, the project aims to preserve and transmit contemporary Haitian narratives.

Author Maxine Hong Kingston read from her work and discussed her writing as part of the Heyman Center for the Humanities Writing Lives Series and the Center for the Study of Ethnicity and Race's Artist at the Center Series. Dorothy Ko, Professor of History at Barnard College, and Marie Myung-Ok Lee, Adjunct Faculty at Columbia University School of the Arts and Founder of the Asian American Writers Workshop, served as discussants.

Renowned author Colm Tóibín will be in conversation with Roy Foster, Professor of Irish History, about subjects addressed in their upcoming works, both set in Ireland. Colm Tóibín's new novel Nora Webster dramatises the life of a woman and her family in a small town in Ireland in the late 1960s.

The Heyman Center for the Humanities, the Writing Program of the School of the Arts, Public Books, and the Institute for Religion, Culture, and Public Life present an evening with Pulitzer-prize winning author Marilynne Robinson, who will read from her work and be in discussion with Unitarian Minister, Robert Hardies.

The Heyman Center for the Humanities, the Writing Program of the School of the Arts, Public Books, and the Institute for Religion, Culture, and Public Life present an evening with Pulitzer-prize winning author Marilynne Robinson, who will read from her work and be in discussion with Unitarian Minister, Robert Hardies.

Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Ron Suskind tells stories that bind his first bestseller, A Hope in the Unseen, to his latest one, Life, Animated, a startling portrait of his son's 20-year battle with autism. The two books, fifteen years apart, are tough-minded, densely-reported works that accord dignity to society's outcasts, showing how they can rise to meet their fullest promise. Mr. Suskind will describe how both books harnessed narrative to drive social change.

A bilingual reading in Russian and English of poetry, with discussion to follow, by four leading Russian poets from points across the geography of the Russian-Speaking world, including Shamshad Abdullaev (Fergana, Uzbekistan), Keti Chukhrov (Moscow), Alexandra Petrova (Rome), and Alexander Skidan (St. Petersburg). The poets will be joined by poet/translators Julia Dasbach (Philadelphia), Kevin M. F. Platt (Philadelphia), Alexandra Tatarsky (New York; Philadelphia) and Matvei Yankelevich (New York).