Video

April Bernard reading John Berryman's "Sonnet 43" at the John Berryman at 100 celebration at Barnard College, Columbia University.

Saskia Hamilton reading John Berryman's "Dream Song 21" at the John Berryman at 100 celebration at Barnard College, Columbia University.

Kevin Young reading John Berryman's "Dream Song 14" at the John Berryman at 100 celebration at Barnard College, Columbia University.

Catherine Barnett reading John Berryman's "Dream Song 20" at the John Berryman at 100 celebration at Barnard College, Columbia University.

An evening of justice poetry featuring Claudia Rankine, Dawn Lundy Martin, and Messiah Ramkissoon. Poets read from their new and published works related to issues of justice and discuss the events and experiences that inspired them. Monica Miller, Associate Professor of English at Barnard College, will introduce the poets, and a moderated discussion, led by Columbia School of the Arts professor and poet Timothy Donnelly, and questions from the audience follow the readings.

The intersection between kinesthetic imagination and scientific ideas are explored in this presentation by Yale University professors Emily Coates (Dance) and Sarah Demers (Physics). The presentation will include several outcomes of their collaborative venture, including excerpts of “Incarnations: Sketches for a Longer Work,” which Coates is currently developing for Danspace Project’s Platform 2015, and a screening of their co-created short science-art film, “Three Views of the Higgs and Dance.” Michael Tuts, Professor of Physics at Columbia University, and Carrie Noland, Professor of French and Comparative Literature at the University of California, Irvine and author of Agency and Embodiment: Performing Gestures/Producing Culture, will offer remarks in response to the presentation, followed by a conversation among the participants.

The discussion on "Old Masters" with Alex Melamid, Art Spiegelman, and Jules Feiffer used as its starting point what renown critic Barbara Herrnstein Smith called “the senile sublime.” From Michelangelo, to Willem de Kooning, to Chester Gould, all of whom lived into their 80s, these are artists whose later works reflect a higher state of mental freedom. It is these late works that have gained recognition at the turn of the 21st Century.

The discussion on "Old Masters" with Alex Melamid, Art Spiegelman, and Jules Feiffer used as its starting point what renown critic Barbara Herrnstein Smith called “the senile sublime.” From Michelangelo, to Willem de Kooning, to Chester Gould, all of whom lived into their 80s, these are artists whose later works reflect a higher state of mental freedom. It is these late works that have gained recognition at the turn of the 21st Century.