Video

An evening of justice poetry featuring Claudia Rankine, Dawn Lundy Martin, and Messiah Ramkissoon. Poets read from their new and published works related to issues of justice and discuss the events and experiences that inspired them. Monica Miller, Associate Professor of English at Barnard College, will introduce the poets, and a moderated discussion, led by Columbia School of the Arts professor and poet Timothy Donnelly, and questions from the audience follow the readings.

The intersection between kinesthetic imagination and scientific ideas are explored in this presentation by Yale University professors Emily Coates (Dance) and Sarah Demers (Physics). The presentation will include several outcomes of their collaborative venture, including excerpts of “Incarnations: Sketches for a Longer Work,” which Coates is currently developing for Danspace Project’s Platform 2015, and a screening of their co-created short science-art film, “Three Views of the Higgs and Dance.” Michael Tuts, Professor of Physics at Columbia University, and Carrie Noland, Professor of French and Comparative Literature at the University of California, Irvine and author of Agency and Embodiment: Performing Gestures/Producing Culture, will offer remarks in response to the presentation, followed by a conversation among the participants.

The discussion on "Old Masters" with Alex Melamid, Art Spiegelman, and Jules Feiffer used as its starting point what renown critic Barbara Herrnstein Smith called “the senile sublime.” From Michelangelo, to Willem de Kooning, to Chester Gould, all of whom lived into their 80s, these are artists whose later works reflect a higher state of mental freedom. It is these late works that have gained recognition at the turn of the 21st Century.

The discussion on "Old Masters" with Alex Melamid, Art Spiegelman, and Jules Feiffer used as its starting point what renown critic Barbara Herrnstein Smith called “the senile sublime.” From Michelangelo, to Willem de Kooning, to Chester Gould, all of whom lived into their 80s, these are artists whose later works reflect a higher state of mental freedom. It is these late works that have gained recognition at the turn of the 21st Century.

The discussion on "Old Masters" with Alex Melamid, Art Spiegelman, and Jules Feiffer used as its starting point what renown critic Barbara Herrnstein Smith called “the senile sublime.” From Michelangelo, to Willem de Kooning, to Chester Gould, all of whom lived into their 80s, these are artists whose later works reflect a higher state of mental freedom. It is these late works that have gained recognition at the turn of the 21st Century.

Thomas Laqueur’s important book, Making Sex: Body and Gender from the Greeks to Freud (1990), is almost twenty-five years old, and his governing narrative, that the late eighteenth century saw a shift from a “one-sex” to a “two-sex” body in Western society, has gained broad acceptance among modern historians and scholars in literary and cultural studies. “Rethinking the ‘One-Sex’ Body” brings together this new research to ask if Laqueur is wrong, and, if so, how he’s wrong and what difference it makes.

The History Manifesto is a call to arms to historians and everyone interested in the role of history in contemporary society. Leading historians David Armitage and Jo Guldi identify a recent shift back to longer-term narratives, following many decades of increasing specialization, which they argue is vital for the future of historical scholarship and how it is communicated. This provocative and thoughtful book makes an important intervention in the debate about the role of history and the humanities in a digital age.

Over the past twenty years a vast public negotiation has taken place over the causes of, and responsibility for, disease. For the most part this discussion has flown under the radar of doctors, historians and public health professionals. This talk will look at a number of environmental pollution and public health cases over the course of the past two decades in which Professor Rosner has participated.