Video

In his recent book The Revolt Against the Masses, Fred Siegel indicts modern American liberalism for elitism toward ordinary Americans, their values and culture, and blames liberals for many of the problems plaguing American Society today. Taking off from Siegel's book, the panelists will respond to his critique, discuss liberalism's history, and evaluate its future prospects.

It has long been recognized that an improved standard of living results from advances in technology, not from the accumulation of capital. It has also become clear that what truly separates developed from less-developed countries is not just a gap in resources or output but a gap in knowledge. In fact, the pace at which developing countries grow is largely a function of the pace at which they close that gap. Thus, to understand how countries grow and develop, it is essential to know how they learn and become more productive and what government can do to promote learning. In Creating a Learning Society, Joseph E. Stiglitz and Bruce C. Greenwald cast light on the significance of this insight for economic theory and policy.

To understand how countries grow and develop, it is essential to know how they learn and become more productive and what government can do to promote learning. In Creating a Learning Society, Joseph E. Stiglitz and Bruce C. Greenwald cast light on the significance of this insight for economic theory and policy.

As part of The Writing Lives Series, the Heyman Center welcomes Téa Obreht, author of the bestseller The Tiger's Wife. Obreht will read from her work and be in conversation with Mark Mazower, Director of the Heyman Center.

As part of The Writing Lives Series, the Heyman Center welcomed Téa Obreht, author of the bestseller The Tiger's Wife. Obreht read from her work, followed by a conversation with Mark Mazower, Director of the Heyman Center.

Max Hayward is a PhD student in Philosophy at Columbia University and the Public Humanities Fellow at the Heyman Center for the Humanities. Having seen first-hand the transformational power of education, and of philosophy in particular, he is committed to bringing the humanities to as wide an audience as possible. To this end, he has helped to found a project that runs discussion groups on philosophy that bring together Columbia graduate students with young parolees in Harlem, in co-operation with the Harlem Justice Community Program. During the Fellowship, Max worked on expanding this project.

The Heyman Center presented an intimate Evening of Poetry and Performance with poet Rodrigo Toscano, poet and visual artist Julie Patton, and bassist and composer Brad Jones.

Max Hayward, Public Humanities Fellow at the Heyman Center for the Humanities, will present a discussion on the conception and implementation of Rethink, a philosophy community outreach program that runs philosophical talks with court-involved youth in Harlem. Hayward's focus is two-fold: First, he seeks to explore what it is that philosophical thinking has to offer a wider public, and what role philosophy as a discipline has to play in pressing issues such as those that confront participants in Rethink. Secondly, Hayward aims to suggest ways in which public engagement can be an enriching resource for philosophy, and present a particular conception of one subfield of philosophy--ethics--according to which public engagement is an indispensable epistemological tool.