Video  Columbia

Reading and discussion of Flores Forbes' new book Invisible Men: A Contemporary Slave Narrative in the Era of Mass Incarceration with author Flores A. Forbes, Kendall Thomas, Nash Professor of Law Columbia University, and Glenn E. Martin, Criminal Justice Reform Advocate. October 10, 2016. Sponsored by the Columbia Center for Justice, Center for the Study of Law and Culture, Heyman Center for the Humanities, and Columbia Center for Contemporary Critical Thought.

From Charles Dickens and the Star Wars epic, to The Sopranos, Orange is the New Black, and the Serial podcast, seriality’s iteration of installments, gaps, sequences, and seasons has drawn audiences into storyworlds both vast and intimate.  "The New Seriality Studies" looks at the past, present, and future of serial storytelling across media, periods, and disciplines.  Three panels explore periodicals, novels, television, comics, film, and music in light of the cross-genre play of seriality’s formal, spatial, temporal, material, and social effects. The closing roundtable, moderated by Sharon Marcus (Columbia), features discussion with A.O. Scott (film critic, The New York Times), Julie Snyder (co-creator and executive producer, the Serial podcast), and Lev Grossman (book critic, TIME, and author of the Magicians trilogy).

Special Panel during The Wire two-day conference: Actors and Activism, Saturday April 9th 2016. The Wire leads Jamie Hector (Marlo Stanfield), Felicia Pearson (Snoop), Wendell Pierce (Bunk Moreland), and Sonja Sohn (Kima Greggs) speak on their community activism.  

This is the first panel of the two-day conference (April 8-9, 2016) on the popular television series The Wire, hosted by the Heyman Center for the Humanities at Columbia University. This panel is titled "Teaching The Wire" and featured Frances Bartkowski, Rutgers University-Newark, Marcellus Blount, Columbia University, Sherri-Ann Butterfield, Rutgers University-Newark, Toby Gordon, Johns Hopkins University, and Arvind Rajagopal, New York University.

This is the second panel of the two-day conference (April 8-9, 2016) on the popular television series The Wire, hosted by the Heyman Center for the Humanities at Columbia University. This panel is titled "Seriality and Narrative Experience" and featured Frank Kelleter, Freie Universität, Berlin, Rob King, Columbia University, Jason Mittell, Middlebury College, and Linda Williams, University of California, Berkeley. The panel was organized by Jane Gaines and Rob King, Film Division, School of the Arts, Columbia University. 

This is the fifth panel of the two-day conference (April 8-9, 2016) on the popular television series The Wire, hosted by the Heyman Center for the Humanities at Columbia University. This panel is titled "Music from The Wire" and featured performances by Diablo Flamez and DJ Technics. Panelists included Sheri Parks, University of Maryland, Michael Casiano, University of Maryland, Ashley Minner, University of Maryland,  Kalima Young, University of Maryland, and Ashley Minner, University of Maryland. The panel was organized by Sheri Parks, University of Maryland.  

This is the seventh panel of the two-day conference (April 8-9, 2016) on the popular television series The Wire, hosted by the Heyman Center for the Humanities at Columbia University. This panel is titled "Mass Incarceration and the School-to-Prison Pipeline" and featured Mariame Kaba, Project Nia, Desmond U. Patton, Columbia University, Carla Shedd, Columbia University and New York City High School Student Representatives. The panel was organized by Carla Shedd and the Center for Justice.

On April 1, 2016, the Heyman Center for the Humanities hosted the conference "1916: The Irish Rising" where scholars from Ireland and New York discussed the 1916 Easter Rising on its centennial. This video is of the afternoon segment, "1916 in Perspective, a Roundtable," featuring: Emily Bloom, Columbia University, Therese Cox, Columbia University, Sarah Cole, Columbia University, Gregory Londe, Cornell University, Janet Lyon, Pennsylvania State University, and Paul K. Saint-Amour, University of Pennsylvania.