Video  Education

Reading and discussion of Flores Forbes' new book Invisible Men: A Contemporary Slave Narrative in the Era of Mass Incarceration with author Flores A. Forbes, Kendall Thomas, Nash Professor of Law Columbia University, and Glenn E. Martin, Criminal Justice Reform Advocate. October 10, 2016. Sponsored by the Columbia Center for Justice, Center for the Study of Law and Culture, Heyman Center for the Humanities, and Columbia Center for Contemporary Critical Thought.

This is the first panel of the two-day conference (April 8-9, 2016) on the popular television series The Wire, hosted by the Heyman Center for the Humanities at Columbia University. This panel is titled "Teaching The Wire" and featured Frances Bartkowski, Rutgers University-Newark, Marcellus Blount, Columbia University, Sherri-Ann Butterfield, Rutgers University-Newark, Toby Gordon, Johns Hopkins University, and Arvind Rajagopal, New York University.

The Confined Arts

December 4, 2015

The launch of the third edition of The Confined Arts (TCA) series took place on December 4-6, 2015.  The 40-day art exhibition launched at an opening weekend consisting of art, poetry, motivational speaking, panel discussions, a promotional screening, hands-on workshops, and more.

It has long been recognized that an improved standard of living results from advances in technology, not from the accumulation of capital. It has also become clear that what truly separates developed from less-developed countries is not just a gap in resources or output but a gap in knowledge. In fact, the pace at which developing countries grow is largely a function of the pace at which they close that gap. Thus, to understand how countries grow and develop, it is essential to know how they learn and become more productive and what government can do to promote learning. In Creating a Learning Society, Joseph E. Stiglitz and Bruce C. Greenwald cast light on the significance of this insight for economic theory and policy.

To understand how countries grow and develop, it is essential to know how they learn and become more productive and what government can do to promote learning. In Creating a Learning Society, Joseph E. Stiglitz and Bruce C. Greenwald cast light on the significance of this insight for economic theory and policy.