Video  Heyman Center For Humanities

Poets Tom Pickard, August Kleinzahler, and Maureen McLane read from new and published work in the continuation of the Poets at the Heyman Center series. Orlando Reade, PhD candidate in the Department of English at Princeton University, chaired the discussion.

Poets Tom Pickard, August Kleinzahler, and Maureen McLane read from new and published work in the continuation of the Poets at the Heyman Center series. Orlando Reade, PhD candidate in the Department of English at Princeton University, chaired the discussion.

Raja Shehadeh’s lecture on the 10th anniversary of Edward Said’s death will reflect on the cages of categorization that imprison Palestinians in contemporary Palestine perhaps more than even the physical matrix of borders, checkpoints, and the Wall. Shehadeh will explore how Palestinians themselves deploy these categories in a language of despair in our post-Oslo landscape, as well as a search for a new language, remembering as Edward Said noted in one of his most moving and lyrical texts, After the Last Sky, that “We are more than someone else’s object.”

Authors Colm Tóibín and Julie Orringer discussed the topic of “Family Novels" with Deborah Cohen, Professor of History at Northwestern.

Through a re-consideration of several classic instances, this lecture explores some of the ways in which the very excesses of polemical or satirical contributions to public debate may themselves be the main bearer of more adequate conceptions of human life.  It asks the unsettling question: might the outrageous offensiveness of F.R. Leavis's notorious attack on C.P. Snow actually provide a better model than contributions that are normally regarded as more 'constructive' and 'helpful'?

A discussion on "Keywords: Toward a Critical Vocabulary of Disability Studies."

Uzodinma Iweala, MD, is the author of the multi-award-winning novel Beasts of No Nation (prizes from the Los Angeles Times, the New York Public Library, the American Academy of Arts and Letters, and Booktrust) and of the non-fiction Our Kind of People: Thoughts on HIV/AIDS in Nigeria (2012). In 2007 he was selected as one of Granta's Best Young American Novelists. Dr. Iweala will read from his latest work, Speak No Evil –which he describes as a “a series of interlinked narratives set in Washington, DC that explores the themes of choice, freedom, and what we must compromise to live in a secure society.”

David Henry Hwang, Tony award-winning playwright of such plays as M. Butterfly, Yellow Face, Golden Child, and Chinglish, visited Columbia to discuss his work, including Kung Fu (inspired by the life of Bruce Lee), which will premiere this spring at the Signature Theatre Company. Joining him in conversation was theater director and Columbia professor Gregory Mosher, former head of both the Lincoln Center and Goodman Theatres, and Jean Howard, George Delacorte Professor in the Humanities at Columbia and a prominent theater scholar.