Video  History

How do we teach the history of imprisonment in the United States when mass incarceration continues to shape our current social landscape? Heyman Center Public Humanities Fellow Emily Hainze will speak about a curriculum project she is developing in partnership with the Prison Public Memory Project, a non-profit dedicated to recovering, preserving and interpreting the historical artifacts and cultural memory of prisons, and the communities with which they are entwined.

Emily Hainze is a doctoral candidate in English and Comparative Literature at Columbia University, where she writes and teaches about 19th- and 20th-century American literature. Her dissertation focuses on women’s incarceration in the United States, exploring how questions of narrative and genre have been shaped by the conceptualization of women’s crime from the late 19th century onward. As a Public Humanities Fellow at the Heyman Center, Emily will work to develop an online repository for digitized archival records of women and imprisonment, with an eye towards classroom use.

Mary Grace Albanese is a doctoral candidate in English and Comparative Literature at Columbia University. Her dissertation centers on the role of the Haitian Revolution in early 19th-century French-U.S. literary exchange. Her other research interests include translation theory, the transatlantic Gothic, and the legal history of slavery. She is also a translator between French and English, with multiple areas of specialization including law, medicine, and education. As a Public Humanities Fellow, Mary Grace will create a forum for the collection, translation, and publication of Haitian history as told by Haitians themselves. Through a trans-lingual oral history initiative, the project aims to preserve and transmit contemporary Haitian narratives.

The History Manifesto is a call to arms to historians and everyone interested in the role of history in contemporary society. Leading historians David Armitage and Jo Guldi identify a recent shift back to longer-term narratives, following many decades of increasing specialization, which they argue is vital for the future of historical scholarship and how it is communicated. This provocative and thoughtful book makes an important intervention in the debate about the role of history and the humanities in a digital age.

Despite the continuous interest in psychoanalysis as a modern system of thought and interpretation, the history of the discipline and the study of analysts other than Sigmund Freud are still developing. Full description at event link: bit.ly/1qJt9Mk This recording consists of the final panel discussion of the two-day conference. In this panel, Daniel Pick, Professor of History at Birkbeck College, University of London interviewed Robert Jay Lifton, Lecturer in Psychiatry at Columbia University. The panel was chaired by Eli Zaretsky, Professor of History at The New School. Final comments were provided by the organizer of the conference, Michal Shapira, Senior Lecturer of History and Gender Studies at Tel Aviv University.

Rayna Rapp, Faye Ginsberg, and Michael Bérubé discuss innovations in special education in NYC and genetic expression of Down syndrome. Rachel Adams chairs the talk.

In the early modern period, the emergence of travel as a means of information gathering on natural history, demography, government, and religion was accompanied by the use of questionnaires to orient observation. This conference investigates the development of techniques of information gathering of this kind and the networks on which they relied. Papers address the integral role of travel in the process of scientific exchange as well as to the ways that information itself traveled in British, French, Spanish, and Swedish contexts. The conference is supported by generous funding from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation (mellon.org) and by the Heyman Center for the Humanities at Columbia University, with the assistance of the Moore Institute for the Humanities and Social Studies, National University of Ireland, Galway. The “Texts, Contexts, Culture” project is funded under the Higher Education Authority, under PRTLI4.

In the early modern period, the emergence of travel as a means of information gathering on natural history, demography, government, and religion was accompanied by the use of questionnaires to orient observation. This conference investigates the development of techniques of information gathering of this kind and the networks on which they relied. Papers address the integral role of travel in the process of scientific exchange as well as to the ways that information itself traveled in British, French, Spanish, and Swedish contexts. The conference is supported by generous funding from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation (mellon.org) and by the Heyman Center for the Humanities at Columbia University, with the assistance of the Moore Institute for the Humanities and Social Studies, National University of Ireland, Galway. The “Texts, Contexts, Culture” project is funded under the Higher Education Authority, under PRTLI4.