Video  Public Humanities

Sahar Ishtiaque Ullah is a Ph.D. candidate in Arabic and Comparative Literature at Columbia University where she teaches and is completing her dissertation on the role of the erotic prelude in medieval Arabic-Islamic poetics. Her research interests also include the classical in contemporary Arabic literature and representations of Muslims in late medieval and early modern European literature. As a Public Humanities Fellow, Sahar will curate an interactive public arts project that includes the works of Muslim storytellers, poets, and visual artists with a special attention to North American minorities and immigrants with roots from regions largely portrayed as conflict zones in U.S. media outlets. 

Natacha Nsabimana is currently pursuing a Ph.D. in anthropology at Columbia University. Her dissertation is concerned with the everyday aftermath of violence in post-genocide Rwanda. It examines the ways in which the violence of the genocide against Tutsi occupies the spatial memory of Rwanda's landscape and the kinds of individual and national narratives such memory allows and disavows. Her project will engage young women at the Rose M Singer Center for Women on Rikers Island to produce a literary journal discussing social justice issues such as racism, slavery, incarceration and sexual violence through the prism of art. This project expands on existing programs developed by the Justice in Education Initiative at Columbia University, a collaboration between the Center for Justice and the Heyman Center for the Humanities.

Liane Carlson received her PhD in philosophy of religion at Columbia University in 2015, where she received her M.A. (2010) and M.Phil (2012) after graduating summa cum laude from Washington and Lee University (2007). Her research interests include the philosophical and theological history of Critical Theory, with particular emphasis on German Romanticism, the limits of the critical power of history, the problem of evil, and the intersection of religion and literature.

Reading and discussion of Flores Forbes' new book Invisible Men: A Contemporary Slave Narrative in the Era of Mass Incarceration with author Flores A. Forbes, Kendall Thomas, Nash Professor of Law Columbia University, and Glenn E. Martin, Criminal Justice Reform Advocate. October 10, 2016. Sponsored by the Columbia Center for Justice, Center for the Study of Law and Culture, Heyman Center for the Humanities, and Columbia Center for Contemporary Critical Thought.

The Confined Arts

December 4, 2015

The launch of the third edition of The Confined Arts (TCA) series took place on December 4-6, 2015.  The 40-day art exhibition launched at an opening weekend consisting of art, poetry, motivational speaking, panel discussions, a promotional screening, hands-on workshops, and more.

How do we teach the history of imprisonment in the United States when mass incarceration continues to shape our current social landscape? Heyman Center Public Humanities Fellow Emily Hainze will speak about a curriculum project she is developing in partnership with the Prison Public Memory Project, a non-profit dedicated to recovering, preserving and interpreting the historical artifacts and cultural memory of prisons, and the communities with which they are entwined.

Emily Hainze is a doctoral candidate in English and Comparative Literature at Columbia University, where she writes and teaches about 19th- and 20th-century American literature. Her dissertation focuses on women’s incarceration in the United States, exploring how questions of narrative and genre have been shaped by the conceptualization of women’s crime from the late 19th century onward. As a Public Humanities Fellow at the Heyman Center, Emily will work to develop an online repository for digitized archival records of women and imprisonment, with an eye towards classroom use.

Mary Grace Albanese is a doctoral candidate in English and Comparative Literature at Columbia University. Her dissertation centers on the role of the Haitian Revolution in early 19th-century French-U.S. literary exchange. Her other research interests include translation theory, the transatlantic Gothic, and the legal history of slavery. She is also a translator between French and English, with multiple areas of specialization including law, medicine, and education. As a Public Humanities Fellow, Mary Grace will create a forum for the collection, translation, and publication of Haitian history as told by Haitians themselves. Through a trans-lingual oral history initiative, the project aims to preserve and transmit contemporary Haitian narratives.