Video  Theater

"Each and Every Thing" is the newest solo show from award-winning actor/playwright Dan Hoyle about how we experience the world in the digital age. From a showdown with a violent felon in small-town Nebraska, to a childhood listening to anti-conformist rants in San Francisco; from the hard-scrabble corner boys of Chicago to the intellectual temple of Calcutta’s famed coffeehouse; from a Digital Detox retreat in remote Northern California to an intimate confession in Manhattan, join Dan in his search for true community, spontaneity and wonder in our fractured and hyper-connected world.  

Internationally acclaimed writer and director Sulayman Al Bassam in conversation with his collaborator Georgina Van Welie on making theatre across the cultural divide. Political by definition, performed in both English and Arabic with actors and a creative team from across the Arab world and the West, their projects have revisited Western texts from an Arab perspective and challenged Western perceptions of the Arab world. They will discuss their ten year Arab Shakespeare project, a recent production for The Comedie Francaise in Paris and Sulayman’s new play The Petrol Station. The new play follows the lives of a pair of half-brothers as they vie for the loyalty and favors of their aging father, all against the backdrop of a vicious civil war of a neighboring country.

David Henry Hwang, Tony award-winning playwright of such plays as M. Butterfly, Yellow Face, Golden Child, and Chinglish, visited Columbia to discuss his work, including Kung Fu (inspired by the life of Bruce Lee), which will premiere this spring at the Signature Theatre Company. Joining him in conversation was theater director and Columbia professor Gregory Mosher, former head of both the Lincoln Center and Goodman Theatres, and Jean Howard, George Delacorte Professor in the Humanities at Columbia and a prominent theater scholar.

David Henry Hwang, Tony award-winning playwright of such plays as M. Butterfly, Yellow Face, Golden Child, and Chinglish, visited Columbia to discuss his work with Jean Howard and Gregory Mosher.