Video  Writing Lives Series

Author Maxine Hong Kingston read from her work and discussed her writing as part of the Heyman Center for the Humanities Writing Lives Series and the Center for the Study of Ethnicity and Race's Artist at the Center Series. Dorothy Ko, Professor of History at Barnard College, and Marie Myung-Ok Lee, Adjunct Faculty at Columbia University School of the Arts and Founder of the Asian American Writers Workshop, served as discussants.

Renowned author Colm Tóibín will be in conversation with Roy Foster, Professor of Irish History, about subjects addressed in their upcoming works, both set in Ireland. Colm Tóibín's new novel Nora Webster dramatises the life of a woman and her family in a small town in Ireland in the late 1960s.

The Heyman Center for the Humanities, the Writing Program of the School of the Arts, Public Books, and the Institute for Religion, Culture, and Public Life present an evening with Pulitzer-prize winning author Marilynne Robinson, who will read from her work and be in discussion with Unitarian Minister, Robert Hardies.

As part of The Writing Lives Series, the Heyman Center welcomes Téa Obreht, author of the bestseller The Tiger's Wife. Obreht will read from her work and be in conversation with Mark Mazower, Director of the Heyman Center.

As part of The Writing Lives Series, the Heyman Center welcomed Téa Obreht, author of the bestseller The Tiger's Wife. Obreht read from her work, followed by a conversation with Mark Mazower, Director of the Heyman Center.

Colm Tóibín is the author of many bestselling and critically acclaimed novels, including The Master (which was shortlisted for the Man Booker Prize) and Brooklyn; the short-story collection Mothers and Sons; and, most recently, both the novel and play The Testament of Mary (which will open on Broadway later this spring, starring Fiona Shaw). Julie Orringer is the author of the short-story collection How to Breathe Underwater, which won the Northern California Book Award and was named a New York Times Notable Book of the Year and a “Best Book” by the Los Angeles Times and the San Francisco Chronicle. In 2011, she published her “expertly crafted” and “emotionally haunting” first novel, The Invisible Bridge. Together, they will discuss the topic of “Family Novels" with Deborah Cohen, Professor of History at Northwestern and author of the forthcoming historical study Family Secrets.

Uzodinma Iweala, MD, is the author of the multi-award-winning novel Beasts of No Nation (prizes from the Los Angeles Times, the New York Public Library, the American Academy of Arts and Letters, and Booktrust) and of the non-fiction Our Kind of People: Thoughts on HIV/AIDS in Nigeria (2012). In 2007 he was selected as one of Granta's Best Young American Novelists. Dr. Iweala will read from his latest work, Speak No Evil –which he describes as a “a series of interlinked narratives set in Washington, DC that explores the themes of choice, freedom, and what we must compromise to live in a secure society.”

The award-winning novelist, essayist, lyricist, and screenwriter Nick Hornby visits the Heyman Center.  Among his many bestselling novels are About a Boy, High Fidelity, and Juliet, Naked.   Serving as interlocutor will be poet and Barnard professor Saskia Hamilton.